Wiley announces publication of Databasing the Brain

02/07/05

New book examines the exciting new field of neuroinformatics

Understanding the structure, function, and development of the brain in health and disease represents one of the great scientific challenges of our time. The emerging field of neuroinformatics integrates neuroscience with informatics to create unique databases and analytical tools for the large variety of neuroscience data types, applying them to brain research and linking them with databases within neuroscience and other fields such as genomics and proteomics. "Databasing the Brain: From Data to Knowledge (Neuroinformatics)" (Wiley; February 2005; $135.00; Paper; 0-471-30921-4) is the first book to comprehensively cover neuroinformatics, from relevant computational science and modeling issues to its diverse applications.

Expertly edited by two pioneers in this growing discipline, the text covers the basic principles and specific applications across a range of problems in brain research. Extensively illustrated throughout, this book discusses the state-of-the-art informatic tools and models and how they are being applied to clinical and basic research. In addition to presenting new ways to acquire, store, visualize, analyze, integrate, synthesize, and share data, this comprehensive overview demonstrates how data obtained using different species, levels of biological organization, and methods can be integrated.

"Databasing the Brain" Offers:

  • A solid foundation for the application of computer science in order to build databases, tools, and workflow environments in neuroscience
  • An analysis of neuronal systems in a quantitative context
  • Specific applications in neuroscience that reflect present and future information infrastructures

"Databasing the Brain" is an invaluable resource for students entering this interdisciplinary area, as well as for researchers wanting to cross-train between neuroscience and informatics.

About the Authors:

Stephen H. Koslow, Ph.D., is the Director of External Relations at the Seattle-based Allen Institute for Brain Science. He formerly served as the Director Office on Neuroinformatics, Associate Director, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health. In addition to coordinating the Human Brain Project, a multi-government agency informatics initiative, he is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American College of Medical Informatics, and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Shankar Subramaniam, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Departments of Bioengineering, and Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the Director of the Bioinformatics Graduate Program at the University of California at San Diego. He is a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and a recipient of Smithsonian Foundation and Association of Laboratory Automation Awards.

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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