AGU Fall Meeting - Media Advisory 5

12/03/04

Complete press conference schedule; Updates on other media events

Contents of this advisory

1. Complete Press Conference Schedule
2. Other Events of Interest to Press Registrants

  • A. Geophysics of Winemaking Field Trip
  • B. Homo sapiens Bites Canis familiaris!
  • C. NCSWA Holiday Dinner
  • D. How to Become a Congressional or Mass Media Fellow--and Why
  • E. AIP Journalism Award Presentation and Reception
3. Press Room Information
4. Attention PIOs: Sending Press Releases to Fall Meeting
5. Press registration information
6. Press Registration Form
7. Who's coming
8. Field Trip Participants
  • A. Confirmed
  • B. Wait Listed

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1. Complete Press Conference Schedule The following schedule is accurate as of the day of this message. It is, of course, always subject to change: press conferences may be added or dropped, participants may change, and topics may also change. This is the final advisory for Fall Meeting; any subsequent changes will be announced in the Press Room at the meeting.

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Overview of Fall Meeting
Monday, 13 December
0800
Room 2012 Moscone West

2004 Fall Meeting is AGU's largest ever. With around 11,000 scientists expected to attend nearly 900 sessions, an abstract book weighing in at 3.4 kilograms [7.4 pounds], and sessions overflowing San Francisco's newest convention hall, it can be difficult for reporters to find the news of greatest interest to themselves and their audiences. Our 19 press conferences just scratch the surface of the available news. The chair of Fall Meeting's program committee is here to help. He will outline some of the newsworthy sessions, lectures, and related events that are not covered in press conferences and provide tips for finding your way through the abstract jungle.

Participant:

  • Robert L. Wesson, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado, USA; Chair, AGU Fall Meeting Program Committee.
  • ***** Permafrost at Risk
    Monday, 13 December
    0900
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    This panel will discuss recent changes in frozen ground in the Northern Hemisphere and their potential impacts on society and the Arctic environment. The permafrost regions occupy nearly a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere's terrestrial surface. A much larger area, totaling about two-thirds of the hemisphere's land surface, is affected by seasonal freezing and thawing of the soil. Research over the last decade indicates that thawing of permafrost is widespread, and that the extent of seasonally frozen ground is shrinking. Many scientists believe that these changes are the result of climate warming.

    Participants:

  • Tingjun Zhang, National Snow and Ice Data Center/CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
  • Frederick E. Nelson, Department of Geography, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA;
  • Antoni G. Lewkowicz, Department of Geography, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada;
  • Charles Harris, School of Earth, Ocean and Planetary Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom.
  • Sessions C12A, C13B

    *****

    Relationships Between Climate Change, Trees, and Insects
    Monday, December 13
    1000
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    Researchers will discuss relationships between climate change, trees, and insects. Insect control and tree planting could greatly affect Earth's greenhouse gases. Planting trees on marginal agricultural lands could sequester carbon and offset at least one-fifth of the annual fossil fuel emissions of carbon in the United States, they will report. Scientists also have found that outbreaks of herbivorous insects may be linked with periodic droughts and heat waves in North America.

    Participants:

  • Christopher Potter, Senior Research Scientist, Ecosystem Science and Technology Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, USA;
  • Jeffrey Masek, Research Scientist, Biospheric Sciences Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
  • Steven Klooster, Earth Systems Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, and Senior Research Scientist, California State University, Monterey Bay, Seaside, California, USA.
  • Sessions B51B, B54A

    *****

    Latest Findings from the Durable Mars Rovers
    Monday, 13 December
    1100
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    NASA's twin Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, continue reaching new geological targets to examine in their territories halfway around Mars from each other. Their missions of discovery have been extended twice past their primary three-month missions, which ended in April. Opportunity has spent more than half its working life exploring inside "Endurance Crater," to provide a deeper and broader context for earlier discovery of Mars rocks that had been laid down under flowing water. Spirit has recently been examining layered outcrops in the "Columbia Hills" for evidence of how water altered the rocks. The rovers are also studying the Martian atmosphere as seasons change.

    Participants:

  • Steven W. Squyres, Principal Investigator for NASA Mars Exploration Rover Science Instruments; Professor of Astronomy, Cornell Universtiy, Ithaca, New York, USA;
  • Raymond E. Arvidson, Deputy Principal Investigator for NASA Mars Exploration Rover Science Instruments; James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA;
  • Goestar Klingelhoefer, Lead Scientist for Moessbauer Spectrometers on NASA Mars Exploration Rovers; Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany;
  • Michael Wolff, NASA Mars Exploration Rover Science Team Member; Senior Research Scientist, Space Science Institute, Brookfield, Wisconsin, USA;
  • James K. Erickson, NASA Mars Exploration Rover Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA.
  • Sessions P13B, P21A, P23B, P24A

    *****

    Landslides (on Land and Undersea) as a Source of Tsunamis
    Monday, 13 December
    1400
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    Despite ongoing controversy, an increasing body of evidence demonstrates the major tsunami hazard from large-scale subaerial [land-based] and undersea [submarine] landslides, especially those formed on oceanic volcanoes. In Hawaii, one of most studied locations for these phenomena, tsunamis resulting from large-scale volcanic flank collapse have run-ups modeled at up to 800 meters [2,600 feet] above sea level. The mechanism(s) of failure may be varied and complex. At this press conference Brodsky presents novel research on subaerial landslide runout modeling based on the amplitude of seismic waves created during failure. Cervelli and McMurtry present new work on the Hawaiian Giant Submarine Landslides. There are also new interpretations from Bermuda and the Bahamas by McMurtry that suggests tsunami impacts caused by the collapse of volcanoes in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.

    Participants:

  • Emily Brodsky, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA;
  • Peter Cervelli, Alaska Volcano Observatory, United States Geological Survey, Anchorage, Alaska, USA;
  • Gary McMurtry, Professor, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
  • Sessions OS21E, OS23B

    ***** ICESat Shines New Light on Global Change
    Monday, 13 December
    1600
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) is continuing its multi-year mission to measure precisely Earth's changing ice sheets and sea ice cover, as well as its atmosphere and land masses. ICESat's new data, collected around the globe through 2004, has enabled repeated analyses of changing environmental characteristics from the polar oceans to active volcanoes. The ability of this profiling satellite lidar (radar-like laser) to define the atmosphere in a novel manner will be highlighted. The mission's principal scientists will present selected recent results to illustrate ICESat's ability to explore and measure our changing planet.

    Participants:

  • Bob Schutz, ICESat Science Team Lead, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, USA;
  • Jay Zwally, ICESat Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
  • Jim Spinhirne, ICESat Science Team, Atmosphere, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
  • David Harding, ICESat Science Team (ex officio), Land/Vegetation, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA.
  • Sessions C21A, C21B, C33B

    *****

    Deep Impact Will Gouge a Crater on Comet Tempel 1
    Tuesday, 14 December
    1000
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    The Deep Impact spacecraft is designed to launch a copper projectile into the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on 4 July 2005, when the comet is 130 million kilometers [83 million miles] from Earth. When this 370 kilogram [820-pound] "impactor" hits the surface of the comet at approximately 37,000 kilometers [23,000 miles per hour], the one meter-by-one meter [3-by-3 foot] projectile will create a crater that could be over 100 meters [several hundred feet] in size. Deep Impact's "flyby" spacecraft will collect pictures and data of the event. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Professional and amateur astronomers on Earth will also be able to observe the material flying from the comet's newly formed crater, adding to the data and images collected by the Deep Impact spacecraft and other telescopes.

    This special briefing takes place at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Reporters at Fall Meeting will be able to watch it live and participate in the question period, thanks to a special satellite link installed for the purpose.

    Participants:

  • Andrew Dantzler, Deputy Director, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA;
  • Thomas Morgan, Deep Impact Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA;
  • Richard Grammier, Deep Impact Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA;
  • Michael A'Hearn, Deep Impact Principal Investigator, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA;
  • Karen Meech, Deep Impact Co-Investigator, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
  • *****

    Aura Tracks Air Pollution and Ozone Hole
    Tuesday, 14 December
    1100
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    NASA's Aura satellite has made the first direct global measurements of tropospheric [lower atmosphere] ozone and other pollutants that impact air quality. These new measurements will track sources of pollution and help improve air quality forecasts. The satellite has been operational for only five months, but has already proved to be a valuable asset in studying the health of Earth's atmosphere. Aura also provides new insights into the physical and chemical processes that influence the health of stratospheric ozone, by measuring most of the gases important to ozone chemistry over the entire globe each day.

    Participants:

  • Mark Schoeberl, Aura Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
  • Phil DeCola, Aura Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA.
  • Principal Investigators will be present for the question period.
  • ***** Alleviating Global Poverty through Science and Technology
    Tuesday, 14 December
    1300
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    Collisions between efforts to improve human wellbeing and Earth's natural systems contribute to profound poverty, as well as environmental degradation. Still, some scientists believe it is possible to end extreme poverty and ensure sustainable development by 2025. Sachs is Special Advisor to the United Nations Secretary-General on the Millennium Development Goals, which aim to halve extreme poverty by 2015. He will summarize the findings of climatologists, Earth engineers, ecologists, economists, public health specialists, social activists, and politicians, who believe that the goals are achievable. Thomson will describe impacts of climate variability on vulnerable regions and provide examples of how forecasting, coupled with improved regional management initiatives, can mitigate disaster. Mutter will present correlations between the state of the Earth and the state of human wellbeing, in order to explore the causes of poverty, which remain little understood.

    Participants:

  • Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director, Earth Institute, and Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development, Columbia University, New York, New York; USA; Special Advisor to Secretary-General Kofi Annan, United Nations;
  • John C. Mutter, Deputy Director, Earth Institute Professor, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA:
  • Madeleine Thomson, Director, Impacts Research, and Co-Director, Africa Program, International Research Institute for Climate Prediction, The Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.
  • Sessions PA23A, PA24A

    *****

    The 2004 Mount St. Helens Eruption
    Tuesday, 14 December
    1400
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens that began in late September continues with no signs of quitting. The growing dome in the crater is now almost half the volume of the previous 1980s dome, but is taller by almost 100 meters [300 feet] than the old dome. While the hazards associated with this eruption have not been particularly high, they will increase as the size of the dome increases and the typical winter snow pack builds up the crater. As the dome grows, the potential for partial collapse increases; this could trigger moderate explosions and/or significant lahars [debris flows] from the crater. The study of this activity has involved unprecedented real-time collaboration of scientists and institutions both near and far from the volcano, using data rapidly shared via the Internet. This has greatly improved the scientific basis for rapid hazard evaluation, in support of public safety decisions by land managers.

    Participants:

  • Steve Malone, Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA;
  • Cynthia Gardner, Cascades Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey, Vancouver, Washington, USA;
  • Dan Dzurisin, Cascades Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey, Vancouver, Washington, USA;
  • John Palister, Cascade Volcano Observatory, Cascades Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey, Vancouver, Washington, USA.
  • Session V31E

    ***** Reduction of Ice Cover at High Latitudes
    Tuesday, 14 December
    1600
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    Researchers will discuss the wide range of changes in Earth's ice cover at high latitudes, based on observations over the last few years. They will provide a comprehensive summary of the state of the cryosphere, the ice-covered portion of Earth. Topics include glacier acceleration in Greenland and on the Antarctic Peninsula, as well as key evidence of newly discovered relationships between ice sheets, sea level rise, and climate warming. The scientists will also present findings on dramatic changes to Arctic sea ice and warming in that region.

    Participants:

  • Waleed Abdalati, Senior Researcher, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
  • Theodore A. Scambos, Research Scientist, Glaciologist, National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
  • Josefino C. Comiso, Senior Researcher, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA.
  • Session: GC43B

    ***** Earth's "Safe Zone" Became Hot During Legendary Solar Storms
    Wednesday, 15 December
    0900 Room 2012 Moscone West

    Heads up to astronauts and spacecraft designers: a region thought of as a safe zone for Earth-orbiting spacecraft was the location of a fierce radiation surge during the record-breaking "Halloween" solar storms of October-November 2003. The radiation blast was the most intense ever recorded in this region of space, a gap between the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth, called the "Van Allen Belt Slot." This region begins about 7,000 kilometers (4,000 miles) and ends approximately 13,000 kilometers (8,000 miles) above Earth's surface. A panel of space physics experts will discuss this event and its implications for all who want to develop the final frontier, from multi-billion dollar satellite corporations to spacewalking astronauts.

    Participants:

  • Barabara Giles, LWS Geospace Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C.,USA;
  • Daniel Baker, Professor and Director, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
  • Jerry Goldstein, Research Associate, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, USA;
  • Terrance G. Onsager, Senior Staff, NOAA Space Environmental Laboratories, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
  • Sessions SM11B, SM12B, SM13A, SM33B, SM34A, SM41A

    *****

    Plumes or Not?
    Wednesday, 15 December
    1100
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    Major volcanic regions that are considered anomalous in a plate tectonic context, such as Yellowstone and Hawaii, are popularly explained by plumes of hot material rising from the deep mantle, possibly as deep as the Earth's core. Observations consistent with this model have been reported for over 30 years, and many scientists believe that plumes are the best, if not the only, explanation for such "hot spots." This view has, however, recently been challenged by scientists who argue that there is no evidence that unequivocally requires plumes and that models based on shallow processes fit the data better for many, if not all "hot spots." While not exactly Crossfire, "Plumes or Not?" will bring together scientists on both sides of the debate and will be convened by Foulger and Natland (for the blue corner, plume-skeptics) and DePaolo and Sleep (for the red corner, plume-advocates).

    Participants:

  • Gillian R. Foulger, Professor of Geophysics, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom;
  • Donald J DePaolo, Professor of Geochemistry, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA;
  • James H. Natland, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA;
  • Norman H. Sleep, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
  • Sessions V43G, V44B, V51B, V53C

    *****

    Innovations in Geoscience Education
    Wednesday, 15 December
    1500
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    Department closures, declining undergraduate and graduate student enrollments, and limited participation of underrepresented minorities have posed substantial challenges to recruiting a talented pool of future Earth and space scientists. Innovative teaching methods, technologies, and access to real-time data are revitalizing the teaching of these sciences in undergraduate and pre-college classrooms. New partnerships with minority-serving institutions and programs to broaden participation in the geosciences have expanded and gained traction. These fields are increasingly accessible to persons with disabilities, thanks to diversity programs and new educational technologies. A new Braille book, called "Touch the Sun," which incorporates images from NASA's SOHO and TRACE Sun-observing satellites, will be presented..

    Participants:

  • Cathryn Manduca, Director, Science Education Resource Center (SERC), Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota, USA;
  • Noreen Grice, Operations Coordinator, Museum of Science Charles Hayden Planetarium, and President, You Can Do Astronomy LLC, Boston, Massachusetts, USA;
  • Ashanti Johnson Pyrtle, Assistant Professor, College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, and Director, MS PHD'S Initiative, Saint Petersburg, Florida, USA;
  • Cassandra Runyon, Associate Professor, College of Charleston, Director of NASA Office of Space Science, Southeast Regional Clearing House (SERCH), and Director of Lowcountry Hall of Science and Math, Charleston, South Carolina, USA.
  • Sessions ED11A, ED12A, ED13C, ED13E, ED21D, ED22A, ED23A, ED31B, ED41A, ED43A, ED43C, ED44A, ED51B, ED51C.

    *****

    Climate Change in Alaska: The 100-Year Photographic Record
    Thursday, 16 December
    0800
    Room 1012 Moscone West

    The climate of the Arctic has been warming over the past 100 years or more, but the long-term trend is difficult to document, because the instrumental record is spatially sparse and dates back only around 60 years in Alaska. Worse, many lay people and political leaders tend to distrust plots of these data. Nevertheless, the manifestations of this climate change can now be revealed by comparing modern photographs to those taken at the same locations 50 or more years ago. In this press conference, scientists will present several photo-comparisons of both glaciers and vegetated landscapes in Alaska, from the Arctic to the warmer coastal regions in the south. These photos reveal unambiguously that the Alaskan climate has changed over the past century, as only a change in climate can explain such significant ice loss from the glaciers and such significant differences in vegetative growth on the landscapes.

    Participants:

  • Matt Nolan, Associate Research Professor, Institute of Northern Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA;
  • Kenneth D. Tape, Research Technician, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA;
  • Bruce F. Molnia, Research Geologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, USA.
  • Session C42A, C43C

    ***** Recent Changes to the Arctic Hydrologic Cycle
    Thursday, 16 December
    0900
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    Recent changes to the Arctic hydrologic cycle may have implications far beyond the Arctic. Researchers are documenting long-term changes in the storage and transport of fresh water in the Arctic atmosphere, lakes, rivers, ice, and seas. Scientists believe that these changes are a response to warming and that the changes in the Arctic are the first sign of a global climate on the move. Much Arctic freshwater is ultimately exported southward to the North Atlantic Ocean. This panel will discuss the latest findings on the intensifying hydrologic cycle at the top of the world, and its potential implications and effects on society.

    Participants:

  • Mark C. Serreze, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Organization, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
  • James W. McClelland, The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA;
  • Ignatius G. Rigor, Polar Science Center - Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA;
  • Daniel M. White, Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA;
  • Michael Steele, Polar Science Center - Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • Sessions C41A, C53A, C54A

    ***** Keeping it Clean in Solar System Exploration: A Planetary Protection Workshop for Science Writers
    Thursday, 16 December 2004
    1100-1230
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    This 90-minute workshop will provide the latest information on how planetary protection--to avoid biological contamination in space exploration--is being implemented and how it will affect future robotic and human exploration missions. Topics include efforts to protect solar system bodies from contamination by Earth life (forward contamination) and to protect Earth from possible life forms that may be returned from other solar system bodies (back contamination). Learn why NASA crashed Galileo into Jupiter, plans to protect Europa and other outer planet satellites from extremophiles, and protocols to protect Mars from Earth life and Earth from potential life on Mars. This session will cover planetary protection policies (Rummel), practices (Buxbaum), science and technology (Kern), and the scientific and political challenges of safe solar system exploration, including communicating these issues to the public (Race).

    Participants:

  • Karen.L.Buxbaum, Planetary Protection Manager, Mars Exploration Program, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California USA;
  • Roger G. Kern, Technical Group Leader, Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California USA;
  • Margaret S. Race, Researcher, SETI Institute, Mountain View, California USA;

  • John D. Rummel, Planetary Protection Officer, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA.
  • Session P43A

    *****

    28 September 2004, Parkfield, California: The Best Instrumented Earthquake of All Time
    Thursday, 16 December
    1300
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    For over 20 years, the U.S. Geological Survey and its colleagues at the California Geological Survey and many universities have operated a wide array of monitoring networks in anticipation of a moderate sized earthquake at Parkfield, California, similar to those that occurred there in 1922, 1934, and 1966. On 28 September 2004, that magnitude 6 quake occurred, and the resulting data provide an unprecedented quantity and variety of information. Among the observations are 1) a spectacular record of ground motion in the nearby region, 2) a notable lack of precursors at the earthquake site itself, occurring instead in a region to the southeast, and 3) a picture of earthquake slip that differs from that of 1966. In contrast to the behavior of the magnitude 6 quakes at Parkfield, smaller earthquakes in the region sometimes repeat identically and appear to be controlled by material or geometrical properties of the San Andreas fault.

    Participants:

  • Jessica Murray, Postdoctoral Researcher, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, USA;
  • William L. Ellsworth, Chief Scientist, Earthquake Hazards Team, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, USA;
  • John Langbein, Parkfield Chief Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, USA;
  • Robert Nadeau, Research Geophysicist, Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA;
  • Anthony Shakal, Research Geophysicist, Strong Motion Office, California Geological Survey, Sacramento, California, USA.
  • Sessions S51C, S53D, S54B

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    Cassini's One-Two Punch
    Thursday, 16 December
    1500
    Room 2012 Moscone West

    This news is so new that, as of this writing, it has not happened yet. On 13 December, the Cassini spacecraft will fly by Saturn's largest moon, Titan, for the last time before the 25 December release of its piggybacked Huygens probe. The probe, provided and operated by the European Space Agency, will descend through Titan's dense atmosphere on 14 January 2005. Titan resembles an early Earth, frozen in time. The 13 December encounter will provide an opportunity to learn more about the Huygens probe entry site. Two days later, on 15 December, Cassini will turn its sights on Dione, a small Saturn moon that shows signs of internal activity. This flyby will be the closest Cassini will come to Dione during the spacecraft's four-year tour. First results from these same-week flybys will be presented at this press conference.

    Participants:

  • Dennis Matson, Project Scientist, Cassini-Huygens Mission, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA;
  • Carolyn Porco, Imaging Team Leader, Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem, Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
  • Other participants, to be announced, based on results from the flybys.
  • Session U22A

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    2. Other Events of Interest to Press Registrants

    The following events have been announced in previous media advisories, and the information remains unchanged, except as noted. To save space, links are provided to review the details.

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    A. Geophysics of Winemaking Field Trip

    The field trip planned for Sunday, 12 December remains as announced in Media Advisory 2: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0434.html#2 and in Media Advisory 4: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0436.html#2

    The updated list of confirmed participants and those on the wait list will be found at the end of this advisory (Item 8). If you are on either list, please read both advisories, above.

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    B. Homo sapiens Bites Canis familiaris!

    Tuesday, 14 December 1815-1930 Room 2010 Moscone West

    Help scientists help you to explain their research effectively. Attend our star-studded panel discussion on science news. For details, see: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0436.html#5

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    C. NCSWA Holiday Dinner

    The Northern California Science Writers Association invites reporters and PIOs covering Fall Meeting to attend its holiday dinner on 14 December, but places are limited. For information, see http://www.ncswa.org/archive/dinner-meetings/12-04.html. This is not an AGU event.

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    D. How to Become a Congressional or Mass Media Fellow--and Why

    Wednesday, 15 December 1230-1330 Marriott Hotel, 55 Fourth Street, Yerba Buena Salons 10-11

    Our annual panel discussion is designed for AGU members contemplating either of these AAAS fellowship programs, for which AGU sponsors one fellow each. With regard to the Mass Media Fellowships, you are urged to attend the briefing, if you are yourself an alumnus of the program or your publications has hosted Fellows. See http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0436.html#6

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    E. AIP Journalism Award Presentation and Reception

    Monday, 13 December 1700 Room 2024 Moscone West

    The American Institute of Physics will present its Science Writing Award in Journalism to J. Madeleine Nash, for her book, El Nino: Unlocking the Secrets of the Master Weather-Maker (Warner, 2002). Following the presentation, AIP invites Press registrants to a wine and cheese reception in the Press Room.

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    3. Press Room Information

    Press Room information is unchanged from Media Advisory 4: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0436.html#3

    Please go to the Press Room (Room 2024) to pick up your badge if you preregistered, or to register onsite. Do not go to the main Meeting registration booths on Level 1. For eligibility information, see Item 5, below.

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    4. Attention PIOs: Sending Press Releases to Fall Meeting

    AGU encourages scientists to provide press releases pertaining to their presentations at Fall Meeting, whether or not they are participating in press conferences. We urge them to work with public information officers at their institutions to prepare releases and other handouts.

    For details, see Media Advisory 4: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0436.html#4

    **********

    5. Press registration information

    Press registrants receive a badge that provides access to any of the scientific sessions of the meeting, as well as to the Press Room and Briefing Room. No one will be admitted without a valid badge.

    Eligibility for press registration is limited to the following persons: Working press employed by bona fide news media: must present a press card, business card, or letter of introduction from an editor of a recognized publication. Freelance science writers: must present a current membership card from NASW, a regional affiliate of NASW, CSWA, ISWA, or SEJ; or evidence of by-lined work pertaining to science intended for the general public and published in 2003 or 2004; or a letter from the editor of a recognized publication assigning you to cover Fall Meeting. Public information officers of scientific societies, educational institutions, and government agencies: must present a business card.

    Note: Representatives of publishing houses, for-profit corporations, and the business side of news media must register at the main registration desk at the meeting and pay the appropriate fees, regardless of possession of any of the above documents. They are not accredited as Press at the meeting.

    **********

    6. Press Registration Form

    The Press Registration Form is set up for online submission, but includes a link to a version that can be printed out and faxed or mailed. Go to: http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm04/?pageRequest=press_reg

    The last day for advance press registration is 3 December. You may also register onsite in the Press Room (Room 2024).

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    7. Who's coming

    The following persons have registered as of the date of this message. If you believe you have registered but are not listed, please resubmit the form in Item 9, above. Please go to the Press Room (Room 2024) to pick up your badge if you preregistered, or to register onsite. Do not go to the main Meeting registration booths on Level 1.

    Joel Achenbach, National Geographic/Washington Post
    Jerry Adler, Newsweek
    Mario Aguilera, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
    Andrew Alden, About.com
    Anatta, National Center for Atmospheric Research
    James Bela, Freelance
    Molly Bentley, BBC World Service
    Phil Berardelli, United Press International
    Linda Billings, SETI Institute
    John Blackstone, CBS News
    Sue Blumenberg, NASA Ames Research Center
    Brad Bohlander, Colorado State University
    Henry Bortman, Astrobiology Magazine
    Jennifer Boyce, Freelance
    Robert Roy Britt, SPACE.com
    Susan Brown, Santa Cruz Sentinel
    Doug Brusa, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
    Mirella Bucci, Freelance
    Peter Calamai, Toronto Star
    Bill Cannon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Lynn Chandler, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
    Kenneth Chang, New York Times
    Francoise Chanut, UC Santa Cruz Science Writing Program
    Thomas Cho, Asia-Pacific Weekly
    Rani Chohan, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
    Glennda Chui, San Jose Mercury News
    Phil Cohen, New Scientist
    Cindy Clark, Scripps Communications Office
    Tonya Clayton, Monterey Herald
    Robert Cowen, Christian Science Monitor
    John Cox, Freelance
    Keay Davidson, San Francisco Chronicle
    Paul Doherty, Exploring Magazine
    Matthew Fordahl, Associated Press
    Andrew Fraknoi, Astronomy Education Review
    Kim Fulton-Bennett, MBARI-Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
    Zhenya Gallon, UCAR/NCAR
    Marie Gilbert, Institute of Arctic Biology
    Helen Gillespie, Today's Chemist
    Donald Goldsmith, Interstellar Media
    Pam Frost Gorder, Ohio State University
    Leslie Gordon, U.S. Geological Survey
    Nicole Gordon, UCAR
    Daniel Gottlieb, Freelance
    Jane Greenhalgh, National Public Radio
    Kimm Groshong, Pasadena Star-News
    Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
    Raven Hanna, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center
    Brooks Hanson, Science
    Richard Harris, National Public Radio
    Scott Harris, U.S. Geological Survey
    Martha Heil, American Institute of Physics
    Laura Helmuth, Smithsonian Magazine
    Tara Hicks, SOEST / University of Hawaii at Manoa
    Ian Hoffman, Oakland Tribune
    Bob Horn, KPIX-TV San Francisco
    Robert Irion, ScienceNOW
    Jeff Kanipe, Freelance
    Dick Kerr, Science
    James E. Kloeppel, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    John Krist, Ventura County Star
    Emily Stewart Lakdawalla, The Planetary Society
    Diane LaMacchia, Earth Images Foundation
    Carolyn Lee, WBUR Boston
    Dawn Levy, Stanford News Service
    Nancy Light, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program
    Frank Ling, KALX Berkeley
    Emilie Lorditch, Discoveries & Breakthroughs
    Greta Lorge, Wired Magazine
    Rick Lovett, Freelance
    Merry Maisel, Texas Advanced Computing Center
    Jessica Marshall, Santa Cruz Sentinel
    Carolina Martinez, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
    Betsy Mason, Contra Costa Times
    Barbara McConnell, National Geographic Magazine
    Debbie Meyer, MBARI-Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
    Mary Miller, Exploratorium
    Ryder Miller, Freelance
    Bruce Molnia, Freelance
    Barbara Moran, NOVA WGBH-TV Boston
    Juliane Mossinger, Nature
    Mary Beth Murrill, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
    Elisabeth Nadin, Freelance
    J. Madeleine Nash, Time
    Amy Nevala, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    Jan Null, San Jose Mercury News
    Sid Perkins, Science News
    David Perlman, San Francisco Chronicle
    Jill Perry, California Institute of Technology
    Molly Peterson, KQED San Francisco
    Charles Petit, U.S. News & World Report
    Hugh Powell, UC Santa Cruz Science Writing Program
    Doug Prose, Earth Images Foundation
    Catherine Puckett, U.S. Geological Survey
    Horst Rademacher, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
    Krishna Ramanujan, NASA Earth Science News Team
    Clarice Ransom, U.S. Geological Survey
    Christina Reed, Freelance
    Donald Robertson, Astronomy Now
    Ned Rozell, University of Alaska Geophysical Institute
    Anne Rosenthal, Freelance
    Linda Rowan, Science
    Ned Rozell, University of Alaska Fairbanks
    Tony Russomanno, KPIX-TV - CBS News
    Anne Sasso, Freelance
    Jim Scanlon, Coastal Post
    Laurie Schmidt, NSIDC/CIRES/University of Colorado
    Mark Shwartz, Stanford News Service
    Megan Sever, Geotimes
    Norman Sperling, Journal of Irreproducible Results
    Alan Stahler, KVMR-FM Nevada City
    Michael Starobin, NASA-TV
    Kathy Svitil, Discover Magazine
    Adam Tanner, Reuters
    Pearl Tesler, Exploratorium
    Mary Tobin, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
    Rei Ueyama, AGU Mass Media Fellow, U. of Washington
    Marijke Unger, NSIDC/CIRES/University of Colorado
    John VanDecar, Nature
    Joe Verrengia, Associated Press
    Ray Villard, Space Telescope Science Institute
    Andreas von Bubnoff, Monterey County Herald
    Lidia Wasowicz, United Press International
    Guy Webster, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
    Eric Wegryn, Exploratorium
    Tara Weingarten, Newsweek
    Rachel Weintraub, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
    Matthias Wendt, WDR TV
    Krista West, Freelance
    Marian Westley, AGU Mass Media Fellow, U. of Hawaii
    Mark Wheeler, California Institute of Technology
    Kasey White, Joint Oceanographic Institutions
    Potter Wickware, Freelance
    Alexandra Witze, Dallas Morning News
    David Wolman, Freelance
    Kathleen Wong, California Wild
    Laura Wright, OnEarth Magazine
    Matthew Wright, Freelance
    Margie Wylie, Newhouse News Service
    Akemi Yoshimoto, Kyodo News
    Byron Young, KVMR-FM Nevada City

    *****

    8. Field Trip Participants: Confirmed and Wait Listed

    A. Confirmed (alphabetical)

    Jerry Adler, Newsweek
    Andrew Alden, About.com
    Anatta, National Center for Atmospheric Research
    James Bela, Freelance
    Molly Bentley, BBC World Service
    Henry Bortman, Astrobiology Magazine
    Peter Calamai, Toronto Star
    Bill Cannon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Kenneth Chang, New York Times
    Phil Cohen, New Scientist
    Robert Cowen, Christian Science Monitor
    John Cox, Freelance
    Helen Gillespie, Today's Chemist
    Pam Frost Gorder, Ohio State University
    Leslie Gordon, U.S. Geological Survey
    Ian Hoffman, Oakland Tribune
    Jeff Kanipe, Freelance
    Dawn Levy, Stanford News Service
    Emilie Lorditch, Discoveries & Breakthroughs
    Greta Lorge, Wired Magazine
    Rick Lovett, Freelance
    Merry Maisel, Texas Advanced Computing Center
    Betsy Mason, Contra Costa Times
    Barbara McConnell, National Geographic Magazine
    J. Madeleine Nash, Time
    Sid Perkins, Science News
    David Perlman, San Francisco Chronicle
    Charles Petit, U.S. News & World Report
    Horst Rademacher, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
    Christina Reed, Freelance
    Alan Stahler, KVMR-FM
    Mary Tobin, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
    Marijke Unger, NSIDC/CIRES/University of Colorado
    Tara Weingarten, Newsweek
    Potter Wickware, Freelance
    Alexandra Witze, Dallas Morning News
    Kathleen Wong, California Wild
    Laura Wright, OnEarth Magazine
    Matthew Wright, Freelance
    Margie Wylie, Newhouse News Service

    B. Wait Listed (in order of sign-up)

    Frank Ling, KALX Berkeley
    Bruce Molnia, Freelance
    Susan Brown, Santa Cruz Sentinel
    Andreas von Bubnoff, Monterey County Herald
    Raven Hanna, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center
    Jennifer Boyce, Freelance
    Martha Heil, American Institute of Physics
    Elisabeth Nadin, Freelance
    Thomas Cho, Asia-Pacific Weekly

    Source: Eurekalert & others

    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
        Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

     

     

    As a man thinketh in his heart, so he is.
    -- Proverbs