The Gerontological Society of America confers 2004 M. Powell Lawton Award to Penn State's Zarit

11/05/04

The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Penn State University's Dr. Steven Zarit to receive its 2004 M. Powell Lawton Award. The distinction recognizes a significant contribution in gerontology that has led to an innovation in gerontological treatment, practice or service, prevention, amelioration of symptoms or barriers, or a public policy change that has led to some practical application that improves the lives of older persons.

The award presentation will take place at GSA's 57th Annual Scientific Meeting, which will be held from November 19th-23rd, 2004 in Washington, DC. The actual conferral will occur on Monday the 23rd at 1:30 p.m. in the Wilson B-M room of the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel. The meeting is organized to foster interdisciplinary interactions among gerontological health care clinical, administrative, and research professionals.

Focusing on mental health issues of older adults, Dr. Zarit's pioneering work in caregiving has revolutionized the field of dementia care. His research and writings are often credited with drawing national attention to the difficulties faced by families providing care to an older relative with dementia. His research and advocacy have been largely responsible for propelling caregiving issues into the national policy arena and mass media spotlight.

The award is named in memory of M. Powell Lawton for his outstanding contributions to applied gerontological research. It also honors an individual for exemplifying one or more of Lawton's outstanding professional and personal qualities. The winner traditionally presents a lecture at the Annual Scientific Meeting the following year. The award is sponsored by the Madlyn and Leonard Abramson Center for Jewish Life's Polisher Research Institute.

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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