GSA confers 2004 Nathan Shock New Investigator Award to UTHSC's Marciniak

11/05/04

The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Dr. Robert A. Marciniak of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio to receive its 2004 Nathan Shock New Investigator Award. The distinction is given for outstanding contributions to new knowledge about aging through basic biological research.

The award presentation will take place at GSA's 57th Annual Scientific Meeting, which will be held from November 19th-23rd, 2004 in Washington, DC. The actual conferral will occur on Sunday the 21st at 12:15 p.m. in the Wilson A-M room of the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel. The meeting is organized to foster interdisciplinary interactions among gerontological health care clinical, administrative, and research professionals.

Dr. Marciniak gained renown for his work at an early age. The results of his thesis have gained wide acclaim and set the direction for the field of research on gene regulation by the AIDS virus HIV. His expertise bridges two important areas - aging and cancer - and he serves as a prime example of a geriatric oncologist.

The award was established in 1986 to honor Dr. Nathan Shock, a pioneer in gerontological research at the National Institutes of Health, and a founding member of GSA. The winner traditionally presents a lecture at the Annual Scientific Meeting the following year.

The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), founded in 1945, is the oldest and largest national multidisciplinary scientific organization devoted to the advancement of gerontological research. Its membership includes some 5,000+ researchers, educators, practitioners, and other professionals in the field of aging. The Society's principal missions are to promote research and education in aging and to encourage the dissemination of research results to other scientists, decision makers, and practitioners.

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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