Four ORNL researchers named AAAS fellows

11/30/04

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Nov. 30, 2004 -- Four researchers working at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are among the 308 to be elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The four from ORNL are Amit Goyal of the Metals and Ceramics Division, Stephen Pennycook of the Condensed Matter Sciences Division and Leonard Feldman, who is a distinguished visiting scientist in the Condensed Matter Sciences Division, and Bob Cushman, retired from the Environmental Sciences Division.

The election of fellow is the highest honor of the association, which is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. The association's mission is to advance science through policy initiatives, international programs, science education and related avenues.

Goyal is honored for his distinguished contributions to the field of high-temperature superconductivity and for the invention and development of the rolling-assisted-biaxially-textured substrates (RABiTS) process to fabricate high-performance superconductors.

Cushman is recognized for his exemplary contributions to scientific and public understanding of atmospheric gases and global climate change.

Pennycook's honor is for his innovative developments in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of materials, and for applications to elucidate the fundamental origin of materials properties.

Feldman is honored for his innovative contributions to the use of ion scattering as a tool for materials analysis and for the understanding of the structure of interfaces.

Goyal, task manager for superconducting materials research in ORNL's Metals and Ceramics Division, is the laboratory's lead inventor of the RABiTS technology. Goyal also is the task/technical leader for superconducting materials research in the division's functional materials group. He has been issued 42 U.S. patents and three international patents. Goyal was also named a 2003 Battelle Distinguished Inventor. He has earned numerous awards and co-authored about 270 publications.

He earned a bachelor's degree in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology. He went on to the University of Rochester, earning a masters in mechanical and aerospace engineering and a doctorate in materials science and engineering. He also earned an executive MBA from Purdue University and an international executive MBA from Tilburg University, The Netherlands.

Goyal and his wife, Sujata, who is an architect, reside in Knoxville and have one son.

Cushman was formerly with ORNL's Environmental Sciences Division prior to his retirement. He was director of the laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. He has several publications on the use of climate model output in impact studies, as well as his earlier work in freshwater invertebrate ecology.

He earned a bachelor's degree in zoology from Swarthmore College, and a master's in ecology from the University of Tennessee. Cushman and his wife, Janet, have two children and live in Oak Ridge.

Pennycook is a UT-Battelle corporate fellow and a group leader in ORNL's Condensed Matter Sciences Division. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and has gained international awards for his work in solid-state science.

He earned bachelors and master's degrees in natural sciences -- along with a doctorate in physics -- from the University of Cambridge. Pennycook and his wife, Margaret, have two sons and live in Oak Ridge.

Feldman is the Stevenson Professor of Physics at Vanderbilt University -- one of seven ORNL core university partners -- and a distinguished visiting scientist at ORNL. Feldman specializes in applying nuclear physics techniques to study materials structure and the nature of the interfaces that form between materials. He holds 20 patents and has authored about 350 publications and co-authored three books on materials physics.

He earned a bachelor's degree in physics from Drew University of New Jersey, along with a master's and a doctorate in physics from Rutgers University.

The fellows will be formally inducted Feb. 19 at the association's annual meeting in Washington.

Source: Eurekalert & others

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