Testosterone may help in recovery from strokes, suggests preliminary findings in study

10/04/04

Saint Louis University neurologists to share results at national meeting

ST. LOUIS -- Testosterone - the hormone responsible for a man's sex drive - may help him recover from a stroke, according to preliminary animal research at Saint Louis University.

Researchers will present their findings at the annual meeting of the American Neurological Association in October.

"It looks like testosterone speeds up the recovery from a stroke," said Yi Pan, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of neurology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine and principal investigator on the study. "While the results are encouraging, this is still very preliminary and we need to do more research."

The scientists compared two groups of castrated rats that had suffered strokes. Half received testosterone and half a placebo. The rats that received testosterone showed significant improvement in neurological deficits while those in the control group did not.

Based on the promising findings, plans are on the drawing board to test whether testosterone helps people recover from strokes, said Aninda B. Acharya, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine and a researcher on the project.

"We are trying to find newer, better techniques including pharmacological techniques to improve the outcomes of patients who have had strokes," Dr. Acharya says. "Many of the techniques for physical rehabilitation were designed for people returning from combat without a limb. They may not be applicable for stroke patients."

He acknowledges that testosterone replacement therapy usually is given to men who have low testosterone, whose symptoms include low libido, poor muscle strength, depression and cognitive problems.

"We're studying giving testosterone for a different indication than people are used to. But the patients who have low testosterone have the same symptoms we treat in stroke patients. If you look at what happens to patients with strokes, their strength is affected. Their thinking is affected. They're depressed. Their sex drive is decreased. There are all sorts of similarities. I don't think they're superficial similarities."

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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