IC-medtech licenses promising cancer therapeutic from Summa Health System

10/26/04

(Akron, Ohio) In September 2001, researchers at Summa Health System in Akron, Ohio reported that moderate doses of the vitamins C and K3 were eliminating many types of cancer cells including prostate, bladder, renal and ovarian. Today, only three years later, the results of Summa's cancer research is being licensed and under a new name, ApatoneTM. Clinical trials of the drug could begin as soon as next month at Summa Health System and other hospitals across the nation.

Indian Creek Medical Technologies, LLC has exclusively licensed Apatone, the novel anti-cancer therapeutic treatment first discovered by James M. Jamison, Ph.D. and Jack L. Summers, M.D, Ph.D, both of Summa Health System, in collaboration with Jacques Gilloteaux, DSc, and Henryk Taper, M.D., Ph.D. of Brussels, Belgium. The Summa team has been working collaboratively with Gilloteaux and Taper for nine years conducting extensive experimentation and now Summers and Jamison are excited by this next step with IC-MedTech.

"What is so significant about our study is that through out research of cancer cells, we have discovered a new form of cell death, never before reported," said Summers.

"We found early on that the combination of vitamins C and K3 seek out tumor cells and appear to leave normal cells unaffected," Summers explained. "The dying cells undergo a new flow of self-destruction in which the cell literally cuts itself into small pieces. This discovery was the first of its kind and to this point, cells were considered to die only by apoptosis (programmed cell death) or necrosis (toxic cell death or injury.)"

According to Tom Miller, CEO of IC-MedTech, his company is excited about the possibilities this drug could bring to cancer patients. "The research is substantial and shows that Apatone leverages a novel mechanism of action that shows strong promise as a clinical candidate to be developed for a variety of cancers."

A practical version of the chemo-adjunct based on low toxicity compounds to improve safety has been developed for use in clinical trials which are already underway. The treatment can be administered by intravenously (through a vein), intraperitoneally (through abdomen) or orally and it has been shown to enhance the performance of at least six different chemotherapeutic drugs (adriamycin, asparaginase, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, oncovin and procarbazine).

Results of the research have been presented in more than 100 papers, abstracts and presentations with more than forty peer reviewed articles appearing in such publications as Cancer, Cancer Research, Anticancer Research, Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology, Life Sciences, Journal of Nutrition, Tissue and Cell, Biochemical Pharmacology, Journal of Scanning Microscopy, Microscopy and Microanalysis and other.

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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