Wildlife Conservation Society hosts public symposium on human-wildlife diseases

09/24/04

"With headlines that make mad cow, monkey pox and West Nile household words, it has become clear that the health of people and that of domestic animals are inextricably linked--there is truly only 'one health,'" said Dr. Robert Cook, chief veterinarian and vice president of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

Working with wildlife health experts from around the world, WCS will host a one-day symposium on Sept. 29th at Rockefeller University in New York City to address the issue of emerging diseases shared by humans, wildlife and domestic animals. The symposium is free, but advance registration is required.

Entitled "One World--One Health: Building Interdisciplinary Bridges to Health in a Globalized World," the symposium will feature more than a dozen experts from WCS, the World Health Organization, Center for Disease Control and other key global and U.S. leaders, discussing diseases such as Ebola, Avian Influenza ("Bird Flu"), and the "mad cow"-like condition called Chronic Wasting Disease affecting deer and elk in the western U.S and Canada. The distinguished panel will address a variety of issues from developing new approaches to help prevent the spread of diseases, to addressing threats to the global food supply from new and emerging pathogens. Experts from conservation biology, policy and law will also be on hand to discuss strategies to better link health and conservation efforts around the globe. With its state-of-the-art Wildlife Health Center based at the Bronx Zoo, and Field Veterinary Program active in dozens of countries around the world, WCS is uniquely positioned to convene the critical mix of expertise needed to assess the complex relationships between health, wildlife conservation, and stewardship of Earth's resources at this critical juncture in our history.

At the conclusion of the symposium, WCS will present a blueprint--the Manhattan Principles--outlining new ways to tackle diseases in a globalizing world.

Source: Eurekalert & others

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