The American Phytopathological Society announces 2004 awards

09/16/04

St. Paul, Minn. (September 16, 2004) - The American Phytopathological Society (APS) is pleased to announce its 2004 award recipients. These awards were presented at the APS Annual Meeting, August 2004, in Anaheim, Calif.

APS grants the Fellow designation to current members in recognition of distinguished contributions to plant pathology or to the Society. The 10 members named Fellows in the Society were: Michael A. Ellis, Ohio State University-Wooster; Bryce W. Falk, University of California-Davis; Thomas C. Harrington, Iowa State University, Barry J. Jacobsen, Montana State University-Bozeman; Harold Corby Kistler, University of Minnesota; Ing-Ming Lee, ARS, USDA, Beltsville, MD; Robert C. Seem, Cornell University; Norman W. Schaad, USDA ARS Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research Unit, Fort Dietrich, MD; John L. Sherwood, University of Georgia; and Turner B. Sutton, North Carolina State University.

James W. Travis, Penn State University, was presented the Excellence in Extension Award. This award recognizes excellence in extension plant pathology.

Karen-Beth Goldberg Scholthof, Texas A&M University, received the Excellence in Teaching Award. This award recognizes excellence in teaching plant pathology.

The International Service Award was presented to Henryk (Hanokh) Czosnek, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. This award honors outstanding contributions to plant pathology by APS members for a country other than his or her own.

The Lee M. Hutchins Award was presented to Mark L. Gleason, Iowa State University. This award honors the best contribution presented in one or more full-length papers reporting basic or applied research of diseases of perennial fruit plants published in a recent, official APS publication.

The Ruth Allen Award for Innovative Research was presented to Howard S. Judelson, University of California-Riverside. This award honors individuals who have made an innovative research contribution that has changed, or has the potential to change, the direction of work in any field of plant pathology.

The Noel T. Keen Award for Research in Molecular Plant Pathology went to Brian J. Staskawicz, University of California-Berkeley. This award recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions in host-pathogen interactions, plant pathogens or plant-associated microbes, molecular biology of disease development, or defense mechanisms.

The Syngenta Award went to Krishna V. Subbarao, University of California-Davis. Syngenta gives this award to an APS member for an outstanding recent contribution to teaching, research, or extension in plant pathology.

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