Virginia Tech professor honored with DeLaval Award

08/31/04

BLACKSBURG, Va.– Ray Nebel, of Blacksburg, a professor of reproductive physiology in the department of dairy science in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech, received the DeLaval Dairy Extension award at the American Dairy Science Association annual meeting recently.

He was honored for his 20-year career of service to the dairy industry and especially for his research in electronic heat detection that resulted in the development of the Heatwatch system, a way to identify dairy and beef cattle ovulation that allows cattle producers to efficiently identify cattle in heat.

Nebel, a Virginia Cooperative Extension specialist and dairy project leader, was cited as the "ultimate 'hands on' dairy Extension specialist who conducts quality research that meets the needs of the dairy industry in Virginia and beyond," said Susan M. Puffenbarger, a Virginia Cooperative Extension agent at Franklin County who nominated him for the honor.

Nebel joined the Virginia Tech Department of Dairy Science in 1985. In addition to coordinating the statewide Extension education program to improve reproductive efficiency in Virginia dairy herds, he teaches in the Agriculture Technology Program and continues his research projects. He has written more than 400 journal and general dairy interest magazine articles and has advised many independent study students.

Nebel received his bachelor's degree from Northeast Louisiana University, his master's from the University of Maryland, and his Ph.D. from Virginia Tech.

DeLaval is an international company that supports the production of quality milk in a quality environment. It provides dairy producers optimal technology and comprehensive service.

Consistently ranked by the National Science Foundation among the top 10 institutions in agricultural research, Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences offers students the opportunity to learn from some of the world's leading agricultural scientists. The college's comprehensive curriculum gives students a balanced education that ranges from food and fiber production to economics to human health. The college is a national leader in incorporating technology, biotechnology, computer applications, and other recent scientific advances into its teaching program.

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