Major scientific discovery in cancer research to be honored

07/23/04

Nominations open for 2005 Pezcoller Foundation-American Association for Cancer Research International Award for Cancer Research

Scientists involved in cancer research, cancer medicine or cancer-related biomedical science can nominate a colleague or professional associate whom they believe has advanced significantly the understanding of cancer and whose work holds promise for future contributions for the field for the 8th Pezcoller Foundation-American Association for Cancer Research International Award for Cancer Research.

The nomination process and other details about the award located on the AACR Website at http://www.aacr.org. The deadline for nominations is Friday, September 17, 2004.

The award is intended to honor an individual scientist for his or her highly original research. In order to be eligible, candidates must be recently published, active researchers, working in academia, industry or government anywhere in the world.

The winner will give an award lecture during the 96th AACR Annual Meeting in Anaheim, Calif., April 16-20, 2005, and will officially receive the award of 75,000 and a commemorative plaque at a May 2005 ceremony in Trento, Italy, where the Pezcoller Foundation is located.

Past recipients of the Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research are:

2004:
Stanley J. Korsmeyer, M.D.
Sidney Farber Professor of Pathology and Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

2003:
Mario R. Capecchi, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor and Co-chairman
Eccles Institute of Human Genetics
University of Utah, Salt Lake City

2002:
Carl-Henrik Heldin, Ph.D.
Director, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Professor of Molecular Cell Biology
Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

Source: Eurekalert & others

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