Design, deployment of wireless sensor networks the subject of NSF CAREER project

05/24/04

Blacksburg, Va. -- Thomas Hou, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Virginia Tech, has won a five-year National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) Award worth $449,295 for research on wireless embedded sensor networks.

The goal of Hou's CAREER project is to develop a theoretical foundation for the design and deployment of wireless sensor networks, which are formed by locating a number of micro-sensor nodes throughout a large area. Wireless sensor networks capable of collecting and transmiting a broad range of data are being developed for surveillance and monitoring applications for the military, the environment, health-care, and numerous other complex systems.

Hou will investigate three areas critical to the design, deployment, and operation of wireless sensor networks: developing optimal network routing for sensing data, understanding network performance limits and trade-offs, and uncovering inherent properties of energy-related network problems.

"Our approach is multidisciplinary," Hou said. "It spans the fields of wireless communications, networking algorithms, and optimizations. The outcome of this research will fill important gaps in the current understanding of wireless sensor networks, enabling this growing field to fully realize its potential."

After graduating with a bachelor's degree from the City College of New York in 1991, Hou earned his master's degree at Columbia University in 1993 and his Ph.D. at Polytechnic University in Brooklyn in 1998, all in electrical engineering. He received Polytechnic University's Alexander Hessel Award for the outstanding Ph.D. in electrical engineering.

From 1997 to 2002, Hou was a research scientist and project leader at Fujitsu Laboratories of America in Sunnyvale, California (Silicon Valley). He joined the Virginia Tech faculty in 2002.

Hou has published extensively in the area of wireless and multimedia networking and is a co-recipient of two best paper awards from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers -- for the 2001 Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology and the 2002 International Conference on Network Protocols.

CAREER grants are the NSF's most prestigious awards for junior faculty members who are considered likely to be the academic leaders of the future. Recipients are selected on the basis of creative career-development plans that effectively integrate research and education.

In addition to the CAREER Award, Hou also has won an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award and a NSF Information Technology Research program grant since joining Virginia Tech.

Source: Eurekalert & others

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