Could autoantibodies predict future disease in healthy people?

05/05/04

NB. Please note that if you are outside North America, the embargo for LANCET press material is 0001 hours UK Time 7 May 2004.

A review article in this week's issue of THE LANCET discusses how autoantibody detection in the blood of healthy individuals could have potential as a marker for future autoimmune diseases such as Rheumatoid arthritis and Lupus syndrome.

Hal Scofield from the Oklahoma Research Foundation, USA, discusses recent evidence suggesting that autoantibodies (antibodies that attack the body's own tissue) are often apparent several years before an illness becomes manifest. He cites recent research among people with rheumatoid arthritis where specific autoantibodies were detected more than four years before the onset of disease symptoms.

Professor Scofield comments: "the data indicate that autoimmune disease is preceded by a long preclinical phase in which individuals can be identified by the presence of autoantibodies. Such identification might allow immunological treatment whereby disease is prevented, as is already being studied in diabetes. Alternatively, even if disease cannot be prevented, perhaps life-threatening but treatable conditions could be avoided, such as diabetic coma as well as severe, acute complications of untreated Addison's disease (adrenal-gland failure) or Graves' disease (overactive thyroid gland). For all these diseases, except type 1 diabetes, further work is needed to assess the natural history of disease progression and predictive value of autoantibodies in healthy individuals".

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

Men will always be mad, and those that think they can cure them are the maddest of them all.
-- Voltaire
 
Stumble This Article Print Email
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter

Users Online: 13267
Join Us Now!



 




Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code