The NYU Child Study Center presents the inaugural State of the Science lecture

04/23/04

Professor Sir Michael Rutter selected to receive first NYU Child Study Center Mental Health Award

On Monday, April 26, 2004, the NYU Child Study Center (CSC) will host the Inaugural CSC State of the Science Lecture. Professor Sir Michael Rutter of the Institute of Psychiatry, London, has been selected to receive the first New York University Child Study Center Mental Health Award and his lecture, "Autism Research: Lessons from the Past and Prospects for the Future" will follow a short award ceremony.

Professor Rutter is a child and adolescent psychiatrist renowned for his research on both the biological and the psychosocial factors influencing child and adolescent mental health. As a researcher and teacher he is particularly interested in building bridges between knowledge of child development on the one hand and clinical child psychiatry on the other. Initially, his work focused on autism and on questions surrounding origins of the disorder. His research activities then went on to include resilience in relation to stress, developmental links between childhood and adult life, schools as social institutions, reading difficulties, psychiatric genetics, neuropsychiatry, effects of deprivation on Romanian orphan adoptees, and psychiatric epidemiology. Professor Rutter is widely considered the most eminent child and adolescent psychiatrist in the world.

The lecture will include an award presentation as part of the Inaugural CSC State of the Science Conference designed to bring attention to scientific accomplishments in the field of child and adolescent mental health.

    DATE: MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2004
    TIME: 5:00-6:30PM
    PLACE: NYU SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
    FARKAS AUDITORIUM
    550 FIRST AVENUE

    TO REGISTER FOR THIS FREE LECTURE, PLEASE CALL (212) 263-2744

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Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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