Partnership will boost maritime research

04/06/04

Agreement could improve safety at sea

A new partnership between Cardiff University and the Nippon Foundation of Japan will boost international maritime research and lead to improved safety at sea.

The world-renowned Seafarers International Research Centre at the University has signed an agreement with the Nippon Foundation to launch a Postgraduate Fellowship Grants programme.

This will enable students from developing countries, Asia and Japan to conduct research in the Centre, of direct relevance to the maritime sector.

The partnership will promote the development of an international network of social scientists working on the human related aspects of the shipping industry and will contribute to human resource development within the maritime sector.

"Social science research is vitally important for the welfare of the one million people who work at sea, and this sponsorship agreement is welcome recognition of the value of the work being done in Cardiff," said Dr Helen Sampson, Director of the Centre. "Ultimately, we intend that the research produced through this programme will lead to improved safety at sea."

Students from developing countries, Asia and Japan are being invited to apply for the scholarships and to enrol on the Masters of Philosophy (MPhil) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programme.

The agreement was confirmed at a signing ceremony at Cardiff University involving Mr Masazumi Nagamitsu, Executive Director of the Nippon Foundation, and Professor John King, Executive Director of University Relations and Development.

The Seafarers International Research Centre, which is part of the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University, is a unique research centre, analysing the lives, work and welfare of approximately one million seafarers around the world.

Source: Eurekalert & others

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