Workshop for new synchrotron light source at Brookhaven

02/27/04

EVENT: First national users meeting for NSLS-II, a new synchrotron light source at Brookhaven Lab.

WHEN: Monday, March 15, 2004, 8:30 a.m. 5 p.m. (with a continental breakfast prior to and a reception and dinner after the meeting).

WHERE: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. The Laboratory is located 1.5 miles north of exit 68 on the Long Island Expressway.

DETAILS: NSLS-II is a proposed new advanced, third-generation, medium-energy electron storage ring that will produce X-rays 10,000 times brighter than the current National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven Lab. The unprecedented brightness of NSLS-II will lead to many advanced experimental capabilities in a wide range of scientific disciplines including materials and nanoscience, life sciences and chemistry, geosciences and more. The program will feature an overview of NSLS-II; a perspective from Pat Dehmer, Associate Director of the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences; a keynote address by Congressman Sherwood Boehlert, Chairman, House Science Committee; and plenary lectures by Rockefeller University Professor Roderick MacKinnon, describing his 2003 Nobel Prize winning work in structural biology, and Paul Horn, Senior Vice-President for Research at IBM, on future scientific opportunities in nanoscience enabled by a synchrotron like NSLS-II. Attendees will include members of the scientific community, including participants from universities, other research institutions, and commercial, governmental, and industrial organizations, who wish to provide input and feedback on the design and direction of NSLS-II, its beamlines and instrumentation.

Press registration is free. More information and a complete program can be found at: http://www.nsls2.bnl.gov/newsroom/workshops/2003/NSLS-II/agenda.htm

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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