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Some Negative Feelings May Improve Work Performance

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on August 25, 2014
Some Negative Feelings May Improve Work Performance

Surprising new research suggests it can actually be good to feel bad at work, and that feeling good in the workplace can lead to negative outcomes.

The study of emotions in the workplace, edited by University of Liverpool researchers Drs. Dirk Lindebaum and Peter Jordan, is the topic of a Special Issue of the journal Human Relations.

They found that the commonly-held assumption that positivity in the workplace produces positive outcomes, while negative emotions lead to negative outcomes, may be in need for reconsideration. This is partly due to this assumption failing to take into account the differences in work contexts which effect outcomes.

For instance, anger does not always lead to negative outcomes and can be used as a force for good through acting upon injustices. In some cases, anger can be considered a force for good if motivated by perceived violations of moral standards.

An employee, for example, could express anger constructively after a manager has treated a fellow worker unfairly.

In such cases, anger can be useful to prevent these acts of injustice from repeating themselves in the future.

Likewise, being too positive in the workplace, rather than resulting in greater well-being and greater productivity, can lead to complacency and superficiality.

One article within the issue also finds that, within team situations, negativity can have a good affect, leading to less consensus and therefore greater discussion amongst workers which enhances team effectiveness.

An interesting contradiction is identified in another study of the special issue. Here, people derive satisfaction from doing “good” in the context of helplines by providing support to people in times of emotional distress.

However, they are negatively affected by their line of work due to people shunning them in social situations (e.g., since they might catch the emotional taint they attribute to the profession of the helpline workers).

Lindebaum said, “The findings of the studies published in this Special Issue challenge the widely held assumption that in the workplace positive emotions generate or engender a positive outcome, and vice versa.

“This Special Issue adds to our knowledge and understanding of how the positive and negative dynamics affect the working environment and has practical application and relevance in the workplace.”

Source: University of Liverpool

 
Businessman working late photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2014). Some Negative Feelings May Improve Work Performance. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 21, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2014/08/25/some-negative-feelings-may-improve-work-performance/74067.html