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Motivated Older Adults Able to Stay on Task

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on July 29, 2014
Motivated Older Adults Able to Stay on Task

An emerging theory may help to explain why older adults show declining cognitive ability with age, but don’t necessarily show declines in the workplace or daily life.

Dr. Tom Hess, a psychology researcher at North Carolina State University believes older adults are good at prioritizing their attention and use this skill when dealing with tasks that they consider meaningful.

“My research team and I wanted to explain the difference we see in cognitive performance in different settings,” says Hess.

“For example, laboratory tests almost universally show that cognitive ability declines with age, so you would expect older adults to perform worse in situations that rely on such abilities, such as job performance — but you don’t.

“Why is that? That’s what this theoretical framework attempts to address.”

Hess developed the framework — “selective engagement” — based on years of study on the psychology of aging.

Hess’ findings, “Selective Engagement of Cognitive Resources: Motivational Influences on Older Adults’ Cognitive Functioning,” are published online in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science.

Hess believes the issue is best discussed from a cognitive performance verse cognitive functioning perspective.

Both views deal with cognition, which is an individual’s ability to focus on complex mental tasks, switch between tasks, tune out distractions, and retain a good working memory.

However, cognitive performance generally refers to how people fare under test conditions, whereas cognitive functioning usually refers to an individual’s ability to deal with mental tasks in daily life.

“There’s a body of work in psychology research indicating that performing complex mental tasks is more taxing for older adults,” Hess says.

“This means older adults have to work harder to perform these tasks. In addition, it takes older adults longer to recover from this sort of exertion.

“As a result, I argue that older adults have to make decisions about how to prioritize their efforts.”

This is where selective engagement comes in.

The idea behind the theory is that older adults are more likely to fully commit their mental resources to a task if they can identify with the task or consider it personally meaningful.

This would explain the disparity between cognitive performance in experimental settings and cognitive functioning in the real world.

“This first occurred to me when my research team saw that cognitive performance seemed to be influenced by how we framed the tasks in our experiments,” Hess says.

“Tasks that people found personally relevant garnered higher levels of cognitive performance than more abstract tasks.”

Hess next hopes to explore the extent to which selective engagement is reflected in the daily life of older adults and the types of activities they choose to engage in.

“This would not only further our understanding of cognition and aging, it may also help researchers identify possible interventions to slow declines in cognitive functioning,” Hess says.

Source: North Carolina State University

 
Elderly man reading a book photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2014). Motivated Older Adults Able to Stay on Task. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 26, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2014/07/29/motivated-older-adults-able-to-stay-on-task/72999.html