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Many College Jocks Pay A Price in Later Life

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on March 4, 2014

Many College Jocks Pay A Price in Later Life A new study finds the first act of a sad drama on college campuses as many elite college athletes face physical and sometimes mental limitations beginning as early as middle age.

Indiana University researchers were aware that college athletes experience more severe injuries, and long-term effects of those injuries.

However, as discovered by lead investigator and doctoral student Janet Simon, the finding that the former elite athletes also scored worse on depression, fatigue, and sleep scales came as a surprise.

The irony of watching a college athlete — typically the picture of health and vitality — decline within a few short years to requiring assistance to perform normal activities of daily living, is a sobering aspect of college athletics.

Simon’s study, which focused on Division I athletes, considered the most competitive college athletes — was published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

“Division I athletes may sacrifice their future health-related quality of life for their brief athletic career in college,” Simon said.

“Also, when comparing former Division I athletes, non-athletes who were physically active in college and the general U.S. population, it appears that, in rank order of the three groups, non-athletes who were recreationally active in college had better health-related quality of life scores, followed by the general U.S. population.”

“This may be because former Division I athletes sustain more injuries and possibly more severe injuries due to the rigor of their sport.”

Simon and colleagues analyzed questionnaires completed by 232 male and female former Division I athletes and 225 male and female non-collegiate athletes.

The study participants were between 40 and 65 years old, and their scores were compared to a representative sample of the U.S. population in the same age range:

  • former Division I athletes were more than twice as likely as non-athletes to report physical activity limitations to daily activities and exercise;
  • 67 percent of the athletes reported sustaining a major injury and 50 percent reported chronic injuries, compared to 28 percent and 26 percent respectively for non-athletes;
  • 70 percent of athletes reported practicing or performing with an injury, compared to 33 percent on non-athletes;
  • 40 percent of athletes reported being diagnosed with osteoarthritis after college compared to 24 percent of the non-athletes. Osteoarthritis has been linked to previous joint injuries.

Simon said athletes have access to a range of expertise during their college years, including strength and conditioning coaches and nutritionists, but they often find themselves on their own after graduating.

“Many of the Division I sports are not lifelong sports, so it is important for the athletes to find sports and activities that can keep them active as they age,” Simon said.

“The most important thing is to stay active. You may have been a former athlete, but unless you stay active your whole life, you may be decreasing your quality of life.”

Source: Indiana University

 
Aspen Photo / Shutterstock.com.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2014). Many College Jocks Pay A Price in Later Life. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 29, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2014/03/04/many-college-jocks-pay-a-price-in-later-life/66649.html

 

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