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Americans Tend to Blame Themselves for Obesity

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on January 23, 2014

Americans Tend to Blame Themselves for ObesityAmerican policymakers have targeted the fast food industry as a leading influence on the obesity epidemic.

A new study, however, discovers Americans actually blame themselves for the problem, providing an example of how policy efforts are often misdirected.

The research survey, conducted by two food economists, revealed that most people believe individuals are to blame for their own obesity – not restaurants, grocery stores, farmers or government policies.

One implication from this research is that creating and enforcing public policies to help reduce obesity and/or encourage healthier food choices may not be as effective as policy makers would like.

University of Illinois researcher Brenna Ellison, Ph.D., said she and her colleague, Jayson Lusk, Ph.D., at Oklahoma State University, are both interested in the effectiveness of different food policies.

Past research has shown many of the food policies designed to improve food choices, such as requiring calorie information on restaurant menus and taxing sugar-sweetened beverages, do not always produce the intended results.

So why aren’t these policies working? Why aren’t consumers responding to increased soda prices or calorie information on menus?

“Obesity is in the news every day so it would be hard to say that people are unaware of the policy initiatives in place to reduce U.S. obesity rates,” Ellison said. “Based on our study results, the more likely conclusion is that consumers’ beliefs about who is to blame for obesity don’t necessarily align with the beliefs of policy makers and public health advocates.

“In the United States, we’re known for being an individualistic-based society, so it’s not exceptionally surprising that we would put this responsibility for obesity on ourselves.”

An online survey was administered by Clear Voice Research whose registry of panelists is representative of the U.S. population in terms of socioeconomic characteristics, gender, and region. Of the more than 800 people in the United States who took the survey, 774 were usable.

The main question of interest asked survey participants was, “Who is primarily to blame for the rise in obesity?”

Respondents were asked to classify seven different entities (individuals, parents, farmers, food manufacturers, grocery stores, restaurants, and government policies) as either primarily to blame, somewhat to blame, or not to blame for obesity.

Results of the study showed that 94 percent of people believed individuals are primarily or somewhat to blame for the rise in obesity, with parents coming in second at 91 percent primarily or somewhat to blame. Survey respondents felt farmers and grocery stores were relatively blameless for the rise in obesity.

Ellison said that one finding from the survey was unexpected.

“We learned that farmers and people who received food stamps were more likely to blame government and farm policy,” Ellison said.

“That seems off. You wouldn’t expect that opinion from people who are benefiting from those policies; however, these individuals could be in the best position to observe the potential harm that some government policies create.”

“Unquestionably, U.S. obesity and overweight rates are much higher than they were 20 or 30 years ago so it is not surprising that policy makers and public health officials are looking for potential solutions.”

That being said, if individuals view obesity as a personal problem, how confident can we be that these solutions will work?

“We need to be realistic about the solutions we’re proposing and implementing, and if people are not buying into them, they may need to be re-evaluated,” Ellison said.

The study was published in a recent issue of Appetite.

Source: University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Obese man with doctor photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2014). Americans Tend to Blame Themselves for Obesity. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 26, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2014/01/23/americans-tend-to-blame-themselves-for-obesity/64900.html