Home » News » Work and Career News » Unmarried Status Ups Risk for Accident Mortality


Unmarried Status Ups Risk for Accident Mortality

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on October 31, 2013

Unmarried Status Ups Risk for Accident Mortality  Emerging research suggests relationship status appears to play a role in predicting the risk of death from preventable accidents.

Divorced people are more likely to die from preventable accidents than married counterparts, according to a new study from sociologists at Rice University and the University of Pennsylvania.

Researchers also determined that single people and those with low educational attainment are at greater risk for accidental death.

The new study reviews the links among social relationships, socioeconomic status and how long and well people live.

The authors found that divorced people are more than twice as likely than married people to die from what the World Health Organization (WHO) cites as the most preventable causes of accidental death (fire, poisoning and smoke inhalation) and equally likely to die from the least preventable causes of accidental death (air and water transportation mishaps).

Investigators also determined that when compared to married adults, single people are twice as likely to die from the most preventable causes of accidental death and equally likely to die from the least preventable causes of accidental death.

People with low educational attainment, compared with more highly educated adults, are more than twice as likely to die from the most preventable accidents and equally likely to die from the least preventable accidents.

The researchers compared 1,302,090 adults aged 18 and older who survived or died from accidents between 1986 and 2006.

The data was from multiple years of the National Health Interview Survey, which includes demographic information about participants from throughout the 50 states, including age, race and income.

Accidental underlying causes of death are defined through the World Health Organization’s 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries and Causes of Death.

Dr. Justin Denney, assistant professor of sociology at Rice University and the study’s lead author, said it stands to reason that if social relationships and socioeconomic resources prolong life, then they should be more important in situations where death can reasonably be avoided and less valuable in situations that closely resemble random events.

“Well-educated individuals, on average, have greater socioeconomic resources, which can be used to their advantage to prevent accidental death (i.e., safeguarding a home from fire),” Denney said.

“In addition, these individuals tend to be more knowledgeable about practices that may harm their health, such as excessive alcohol and drug use.

“And marital status is influential in that it can provide positive support, may discourage a partner’s risk and offer immediate support that saves lives in the event of an emergency.”

Denney hopes the research will encourage further research of accidental death and how it may be prevented.

Source: Rice University

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2013). Unmarried Status Ups Risk for Accident Mortality. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 21, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/10/31/unmarried-status-ups-risk-for-accident-mortality/61398.html