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New Guidelines on Diet for Treating Anorexia

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on September 23, 2013

New Guidelines on Diet for Treating AnorexiaEmerging research provides new evidence-based suggestions on how to treat young people suffering from malnutrition related to anorexia.

Researchers discovered higher calorie diets produce twice the rate of weight gain compared to the lower calorie diets that currently are recommended for adolescents hospitalized with anorexia nervosa.

The findings, from University of California – San Francisco researchers, will be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health along with an accompanying editorial and two supporting studies.

The new research challenges the current conservative approach to feeding adolescents with anorexia nervosa during hospitalization for malnutrition.

“These findings are crucial to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of young people suffering from malnutrition related to anorexia nervosa,” said Andrea Garber, Ph.D., R.D.

“This is the first study to follow patients in the hospital on a more aggressive feeding protocol and it’s clear that we’re seeing better results as compared to the traditional approach,” said Garber, who led the research with colleagues in the UCSF Adolescent Eating Disorders Program.

The American Psychiatric Association, American Dietetic Association and others recommend starting with about 1,200 calories per day and advancing slowly by 200 calories every other day.

This “start low and go slow” approach is intended to avoid refeeding syndrome — a potentially fatal condition resulting from rapid electrolyte shifts, a well-known risk when starting nutrition therapy in a starving patient.

In 2011, Garber and her colleagues published a study that was the first to show that adolescents on these lower-calorie diets had poor outcomes, including initial weight loss followed by poor weight gain and long hospital stays.

“That study showed that the lower-calorie diets were contributing to the so-called ‘underfeeding syndrome’ and are just too conservative for most of the adolescents that we hospitalize,” said Garber.

“Now we’ve compared a higher-calorie approach and found that it dramatically increases the rate of weight gain and shortens hospital stay.”

In the new study, researchers evaluated 56 adolescent patients who were placed on higher-calorie diets starting at 1,800 calories per day and advanced by about 120 calories per day, versus those starting on 1,100 calories a day and advanced at a slower rate of 100 calories per day.

Study participants were adolescents with anorexia nervosa who required hospitalization for malnutrition indicated by low body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate and body mass index. The primarily white female adolescent patients were fed three meals and three snacks each day and their vital signs were monitored closely, with their heart rates measured continuously and electrolytes checked twice a day.

When comparing the two groups, the rate of weight gain was almost double on higher- versus lower-calorie diets, and patients receiving more calories were hospitalized for an average of seven fewer days, without an increased risk of refeeding syndrome.

“This higher calorie approach is a major shift in treatment that looks really promising — not only from a clinical perspective of better weight gain, but from the perspective of these young people who want to get better quickly and get back to their ‘real’ lives,” Garber said.

The tactic has been used since 2008 in the UCSF Adolescent Eating Disorders Program.

Source: University of California – San Francisco

Anorexia word collage photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2013). New Guidelines on Diet for Treating Anorexia. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 28, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/09/23/new-guidelines-on-diet-for-treating-anorexia/59812.html