Home » News » Work and Career News » Stress Brings Out Food Habits, Good & Bad


Stress Brings Out Food Habits, Good & Bad

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on July 18, 2013

Stress Brings Out Food Habits, Good & BadSome experts believe much of the weight gain across the U.S. over the past 50 years is attributable to stress.

Theoretically, eating relieves stress by stimulating the release of body chemicals that help to raise mood and bring about a feeling of satisfaction and well-being.

Now, new research finds that stress does not drive people to eat unhealthy, high-calorie, low-nutrient comfort food, but causes people to seek the foods they eat out of habit – regardless of how healthy or unhealthy that food is.

The research co-authored and presented by David Neal, Ph.D., contradicts the conventional wisdom that people who are stressed-out turn to high-calorie, low-nutrient comfort food.

“Habits don’t change in a high-pressure situation,” Neal said. “People default to what their habits are under stress, whether healthy or not.”

In the study he and his co-authors conducted this year, 59 MBA students at the University of California, Los Angeles, were asked during midterm exams which snack they would like from an array that included healthy snacks (fruit, non-fat yogurt, whole wheat crackers, nuts/soy chips) and unhealthy options (various candy bars, flavored popcorn, sugar cookies).

They also were asked to rate how often during the week they choose that snack. The results found that during peak stress like an exam, participants were likely to fall back on their habitual snack.

“Habits are 45 percent of daily life,” Neal said. “They cause us to disregard rational or motivational drivers and instead be cued by context, automated actions, time pressure and low self-control.”

This kind of research has significant implications for food manufacturers trying to establish new products with consumers, said Neale Martin, Ph.D.

Martin noted that consumers already are habituated to the current products on store shelves, with the average weekly shopping trip taking about 45 minutes and including 31 items.

“Think about the cognitive efficiency of that effort,” Martin said. “Think of how many things you’re not looking at; how many things you are ignoring.”

He believes that is a major reason about 80 percent of new products fail or dramatically underperform, a rate that has been largely unchanged for decades. A new product has to become part of the daily habits of consumers, which is not an easy task.

Source: Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)

Woman deciding between an apple or donut photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2013). Stress Brings Out Food Habits, Good & Bad. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 22, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/07/18/stress-brings-out-food-habits-good-bad/57328.html

 

Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 9697
Join Us Now!