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Could Avoidance Really Work as a Coping Strategy?

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on July 10, 2013

Could Avoidance Really Work as a Coping Strategy?A new study suggests the decision to avoid certain activities, functions or conflicts may be the correct plan when multiple priorities collide.

Achieving an appropriate work/life balance is a difficult task that often produces conflict. For example, skipping a family function to stay late at work can lead to less satisfaction with work.

Experts say it is helpful to have quick escapes that give our mind a bit of a break, be it going to a coffee shop, listening to music or exercising.

In the new study, Bonnie Cheng, a Ph.D. candidate, and Dr. Julie McCarthy, an associate professor at the Rotman School of Management and the University of Toronto Scarborough evaluated a group of undergraduates who also worked outside of school and had family responsibilities.

The researchers surveyed the students at two different points in time to gauge how much conflict they were experiencing from their competing responsibilities, the different coping mechanisms they used to deal with them, and how much satisfaction they derived from their activities.

The study found that students who used avoidance strategies, such as not dwelling on their problems, were better able to manage conflict across work, family, and school, and experienced more satisfaction.

“Our intuitive notion of avoidance is that it’s counterproductive, that it’s running away from your problems,” says Cheng. But, she says, there are different kinds of avoidance.

“We found that while wishing for your problems to magically disappear is counterproductive, the process of taking your mind off the problems at hand actually helped people manage multiple role responsibilities and increased their satisfaction.”

The trick, she stresses, is not allowing avoidance to slip into escapism. The finding is equally applicable to any situation where people are juggling multiple role responsibilities, including volunteering and coaching.

The key point for managing multiple roles is that people are giving their minds the occasional break. Workplaces and schools can do this by providing places such as lounges where people can go to detach a little, by socializing, meditating, listening to music, or whatever works best for them.

Cheng says the study’s findings point to strategies that can empower individuals to manage work, family, and school responsibilities.

“That’s not to devalue organizational initiatives,” she says. “We see this as something people can do on their own, in tandem with organizational initiatives,” she says.

Source: University of Toronto

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2013). Could Avoidance Really Work as a Coping Strategy?. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 31, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/07/10/could-avoidance-really-work-as-a-coping-strategy/57025.html

 

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