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Menopause May Stifle Memory

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on May 24, 2013

Menopause May Stifle Memory The association between menopause and memory alterations has been debated for decades.

New research finally confirms the assertion that a woman’s change of life may be associated with memory impairments.

In the study, published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), researchers used objective tests to prove that when a woman is stressed by hot flashes, her memory may be transformed.

In the past, some studies showed that hot flashes were related to memory problems, and some didn’t.

Other studies showed that, even though there was a relationship between hot flashes and what women said about memory problems, objective tests didn’t confirm it.

In the new study, researchers from the University of Illinois and Northwestern University gave a battery of eight tests of attention and recall to 68 women age 44 to 62 who had at least 35 hot flashes a week.

The women also completed questionnaires about their menopause symptoms, mood, and memory.

Investigators discovered that women who said they had trouble with memory really did.

Also, those who had more trouble with hot flashes did worse on the tests, and women with more hot flashes struggled longer with memory problems than women who had fewer hot flashes.

Furthermore, women who reported more negative emotions did worse on the tests than women who had fewer.

Source: The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Woman with her eyes closed holding her head photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2013). Menopause May Stifle Memory. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 26, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/05/24/menopause-may-stifle-memory/55209.html