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Tackling the ‘Dumb Jock’ Stereotype

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on April 23, 2013

Tackling the Dumb Jock Stereotype Despite the “student-athlete” label, college athletes are often viewed as being all brawn and no brain. A new initiative calls for proactive measures to improve an athlete’s academic self-image and change public perception of athletic aptitude.

In the new study, Michigan State University researchers found that an approach by college coaches to emphasize their players’ academic abilities appear to provide the best defense against the effects of “dumb jock” stereotypes. Researchers found that student-athletes were significantly more likely to be confident in the classroom if they believed their coaches expected high academic performance, not just good enough grades to be eligible for sports.

“Coaches spend a lot of time with their players, and they can play such an important role to build academic confidence in student-athletes,” said lead author and sports psychologist Dr. Deborah Feltz.

The study, found in the Journal of College Student Development, focuses on the concept of “stereotype threat.” This theory holds that stereotypes are self-fulfilling prophecies: They create anxiety in the stereotyped group, causing them to behave in the expected way.

For the investigation, Feltz and her graduate students wanted to see what factors influence student-athletes’ susceptibility to the “dumb jock” stereotype.

“It’s well-documented in the literature that many student-athletes hear prejudicial remarks from professors who say things like, ‘This test is easy enough that even an athlete could pass it,’” Feltz said.  “They’re kind of the last group of students who can be openly discriminated against.”

Investigators surveyed more than 300 student-athletes representing men’s and women’s teams from small and large universities and a range of sports, from basketball and football to cross-country and rowing.

They found the more strongly student-athletes identified themselves as athletes, the less confident they were with their academic skills, and the more keenly they felt that others expected them to do poorly in school. Players in high-profile sports were even more likely to feel they were weak students.

Feltz said the data suggest that coaches who put a premium on education may be in the best position to boost their players’ confidence in the classroom, but professors, academic advisers and classmates also have a part to play.

“They don’t have to do much,” she said. “It may be enough to just remind players they are college students, which is a big deal, you know? A lot of these students are the first in their family to go to college.”

Source: Michigan State University

Student ball player by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2013). Tackling the ‘Dumb Jock’ Stereotype. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 30, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/04/23/tackling-the-dumb-jock-stereotype/54012.html