Home » News » Substance Abuse News » Parental Counseling Helps to Slow College Drinking


Parental Counseling Helps to Slow College Drinking

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on March 20, 2013

Parental Counseling Helps to Slow College Drinking A new study by a Penn State researcher discovers talking with a teen about drinking alcohol before they begin college is an effective strategy to moderate college drinking.

Dr. Robert Turrisi, a professor of biobehavioral health, developed a parent handbook to guide parents on what to say to their children before they begin college.

“Over 90 percent of teens try alcohol outside the home before they graduate from high school,” said Turrisi.

“It is well known that fewer problems develop for every year that heavy drinking is delayed. Our research over the past decade shows that parents can play a powerful role in minimizing their teens’ drinking during college when they talk to their teens about alcohol before they enter college.”

In the study, researchers recruited 1,900 participants by randomly selecting incoming freshmen to a large, public northeastern university.

Each of the individuals was identified as belonging to one of four groups: nondrinkers, weekend light drinkers, weekend heavy drinkers and heavy drinkers.

The team mailed Turrisi’s handbook to the parents of the student participants. The 22-page handbook contained information that included an overview of college student drinking, strategies and techniques for communicating effectively, ways to help teens develop assertiveness and resist peer pressure and in-depth information on how alcohol affects the body.

The parents were asked to read the handbook and then talk to their teens about the content of the handbook at one of three times to which they were randomly assigned: (1) during the summer before college, (2) during the summer before college and again during the fall semester of the first year of college and (3) during the fall semester of the first year of college.

“We were trying to determine the best timing and dosage for delivering the parent intervention,” Turrisi said. “For timing, we compared pre-college matriculation to after-college matriculation. For dosage, we compared one conversation about alcohol to two conversations about alcohol.”

Study results have been published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

“We know that without an intervention there is movement from each drinking level into higher drinking levels,” Turrisi said. “For example, non-drinkers tend to become light drinkers, light drinkers will become medium drinkers and medium drinkers will become heavy drinkers.

“Our results show that if parents follow the recommendations suggested in the handbook and talk to their teens before they enter college, their teens are more likely to remain in the non-drinking or light-drinking groups or to transition out of a heavy-drinking group if they were already heavy drinkers.”

However, timing is important as researchers discovered talking to teens in the fall of the first year of college was not effective. Likewise, adding extra parent materials in the fall seemed to have no additional benefit.

Source: Penn State

Teenager with her parents photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2013). Parental Counseling Helps to Slow College Drinking. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 18, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/03/20/parental-counseling-helps-to-slow-college-drinking/52816.html

 

Family &
Parenting



Recommended Books

  • Tending the Family Heart
  • Connecting Your Family in Disconnecting Times, a parenting e-book by Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D.
  •  
  • Purchase Child Psychology and Development for Dummies now!
  • by Laura L. Smith, Ph.D. and Charles H. Elliott, Ph.D.
  •  


Latest Articles


Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 6360
Join Us Now!