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Positive Emotions Improve Health Across the Globe

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on March 11, 2013

Positive Emotions Improve Health Across the Globe Emerging research suggests the health benefit of maintaining positive emotions is a phenomenon that occurs in all settings, including third world countries.

Even some impoverished countries residents reported stronger positive emotions and health than residents of the United States.

Experts believe the finding shows the importance of the mind-body connection to wellness and quality of life in low-income countries.

Researchers say the study, published in Psychological Science, is the first to examine the emotion-health connection in a representative sample of 150,000 people in 142 countries. Previous research on the topic has been limited to industrialized nations.

“We wondered whether the fact that emotions make a difference in our health is simply because we have the luxury of letting them,” said psychologist Dr. Sarah Pressman, the study’s lead author.

“We wanted to assess the impact of emotions on health in places where people face famine, homelessness and serious safety concerns that might be more critical correlates of wellness.”

Researchers were surprised to find that the link between positive emotions (enjoyment, love, happiness) and health is stronger in countries with a weaker gross domestic product.

In fact, the association increased as GDP decreased, according to Pressman.

People in Malawi, which has a per capita GDP of $900, show a more robust connection between positive emotions and health than residents of the U.S., which has a per capita GDP of $49,800.

“A hostile American with hypertension can take blood pressure-lowering medication. A Malawian cannot,” Pressman said. “Medical interventions might lower the impact of emotions on health.”

Using data from the Gallup World Poll, researchers noted whether participants had reported experiencing enjoyment, love, happiness, worry, sadness, stress, boredom, depression or anger during the previous day.

Investigators also measured physical health and the degree to which subjects’ basic needs were met. Security was assessed by asking if participants felt safe walking alone at night or whether they had been robbed, assaulted or mugged.

“We hope that by showing that this phenomenon is prevalent and stronger than some factors considered critical to wellness, more attention will be drawn to the importance of studying both positive and negative emotions,” Pressman said.

Source: Association for Psychological Science

Happy healthy woman photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2013). Positive Emotions Improve Health Across the Globe. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 28, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/03/11/positive-emotions-improve-health-across-the-globe/52472.html