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Memory Training May Help Relieve Depression

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on September 18, 2012

Memory Training May Help Relieve DepressionNew research suggests memory training that helps individuals recall specific events may reduce symptoms of depression.

Experts say depression is often accompanied by an inability to recall items or situations in the past. Researchers say this inability to retrieve memories of the past impairs an individual’s ability to solve problems and leads them to focus on feelings of distress.

In a study to be published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, researchers investigated whether a particular training program, Memory Specificity Training, might improve people’s memory for past events and ameliorate their symptoms of depression.

In Iran, the researchers recruited 23 adolescent Afghani refugees who had lost their fathers in the war in Afghanistan and who showed symptoms of depression.

Twelve of the adolescents were randomly assigned to participate in the memory training program and 11 were randomly assigned to a control group that received no training.

All of the adolescents completed a memory test in which they saw 18 positive, neutral, and negative words in Persian and were asked to recall a specific memory related to each word. Their responses were categorized as either a specific or a non-specific type of memory.

They also completed questionnaires design to measure symptoms of depression and anxiety symptoms.

For five weeks, the adolescents assigned to the training attended a weekly 80-minute group session, in which they learned about different types of memory and memory recall, and practiced recalling specific memories after being given positive, neutral, and negative keywords.

At the end of the five weeks, both the training group and the control group were given the same memory test that they were given at the beginning of the study. And they took the memory test again as part of a follow-up visit two months later.

The adolescents who participated in the training were able to provide more specific memories after the training than those who did not receive intervention. Moreover, this group also showed fewer symptoms of depression than the control group at the two month follow-up.

Researchers discovered that the relationship between participant group (training or control) and their symptoms of depression at follow-up could be accounted for by changes in specific memory recall over time.

Accordingly, investigators believe future stand-alone training programs that focus on specific memory recall can improve depression symptoms.

Study authors Laura Jobson of the University of East Anglia, and Tim Dalgleish, Ph.D., of the Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, and colleagues, said that for individuals suffering from depression, “including a brief training component that targets memory recall as an adjunct to cognitive-behavioral therapy or prior therapy may have beneficial effects on memory recall and mood.”

Source: Association for Psychological Science

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2012). Memory Training May Help Relieve Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 21, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2012/09/18/memory-training-may-help-relieve-depression/44749.html