Home » News » Students News » New Program Builds Social Skills in Autistic Teens


New Program Builds Social Skills in Autistic Teens

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on June 14, 2012

New Program Builds Social Skills in Autistic TeensContemporary educational practice is usually to “mainstream” children with special needs, with those students getting as much of their education as possible in regular classes.

It has proven effective in minimizing stigmas and equalizing educational opportunities. But it can be a high bar for teens with an autism spectrum disorder.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by impairments in communication and social interaction. The level of impairment varies among individuals. Some teens may be severely impaired while others may be highly functional, more akin to Asperger’s syndrome.

But without the proper social skills, even mainstreamed, high-functioning teens don’t quite fit into the general social milieu of middle school or high school. Unfortunately, this may lead to ridicule and bullying, leading to a lowered self-esteem and self-worth.

Since 2006, however, the UCLA PEERS (Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills) clinic has assisted high-functioning teens with ASD by literally teaching them the strategies they need to fit in better with their peers.

And while previous research demonstrated that the program was effective, it wasn’t known whether the new skills “stuck” with these teens after they completed the PEERS classes.

In a new study found in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Elizabeth Laugeson, director of the PEERS Clinic, and colleagues look at whether the skills taught during high school stayed with a teen as after the specialized instruction.

ASD includes a range of pervasive developmental disorders characterized by problems with communication and socialization; it’s estimated that one in 88 children born in the United States has some form of ASD.

The researchers’ findings show that the PEERS intervention resulted in significant improvements in social skills, as reported by parents and teachers using standardized measurements of social functioning.

Reports from parents also suggested that teens’ ASD symptoms related to social responsiveness decreased significantly by the end of the class and even at the long-term, 14-week followup. In addition, the teens’ knowledge of social skills improved, as did the frequency of their get-togethers with their peers.

Teacher ratings of the teens’ social functioning in class also showed significant improvements at the long-term followup — an important finding, since the teachers did not know the teens had participated in the PEERS class.

Both parents and teachers also reported there were fewer problem behaviors with the teens 14 weeks after the program was over.

“Teens not only showed better social competence and greater understanding of social skills, but they were having more frequent get-togethers with their peers because they had developed the critical skills needed to make and keep friends,” said Laugeson.

Studies on the effectiveness of social skills training for individuals with ASD indicate that intervention during childhood and adolescence is critical. However, very few evidence-based interventions focus on improving the social competence of teens with ASD, which makes the present findings unique and important, Laugeson said.

“This is exciting news,” she said. “It shows that teens with autism can learn social skills and that the tools stick even after the program is over, improving their quality of life and helping them to develop meaningful relationships and to feel more comfortable within their social world. The fact that these social skills are sticking is critical, because we need them to thrive throughout our lives.”

Parental involvement is integral and in fact is key to the success of the program, says Laugeson. The PEERS classes, which focus on teaching the rules of social etiquette to teens, require parents to participate as well.

In separate meetings, the parents are also provided with information on how to be social coaches for their teens in the real world. Many of the social skills taught are those most of us know intuitively: how to have a conversation (by trading information), showing good sportsmanship (“Hey, nice shot!”), and how to avoid bullying or deflect taunts (“Yeah, whatever”).

The classes meet for 90 minutes once a week for 14 weeks and include brief lectures, role-playing demonstrations, behavioral rehearsal exercises for teens to practice newly learned skills, in-class coaching with performance feedback, and weekly “homework” assignments, supervised by parents, such as inviting a friend over for a get-together at home.

“The class is very structured, and the skills are broken down into small rules and steps of social etiquette that give the teens specific actions they can take in response to a social situation,” Laugeson said. “This method of instruction is very appealing to teens with autism because they tend to think concretely and literally and often learn by rote.”

What makes this program even more unique, Laugeson said, is that it teaches the skills used by socially accepted teens — not what adults think teens should do.

For example, if teens with ASD are teased, “most adults will tell teens to ignore the person, walk away or tell an adult,” she said. “But when you ask teens if this works, they say no. So we want to teach our teens to do what kids that are socially accepted are naturally doing.

“In this case, that would be to give a short comeback that shows what the person said didn’t bother them — like saying ‘whatever’ or ‘yeah, and?’ They learn not to take the bait.”

Source: UCLA

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2012). New Program Builds Social Skills in Autistic Teens. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 19, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2012/06/14/new-program-builds-social-skills-in-autistic-teens/40137.html

 

Family &
Parenting



Recommended Books

  • Tending the Family Heart
  • Connecting Your Family in Disconnecting Times, a parenting e-book by Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D.
  •  
  • Purchase Child Psychology and Development for Dummies now!
  • by Laura L. Smith, Ph.D. and Charles H. Elliott, Ph.D.
  •  


Latest Articles