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Working May Help Mom’s Mental Health

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on December 13, 2011

Working May Help Moms Mental Health Getting out of the house and working appears to be a healthy tonic for mothers as researchers discover being a stay-at-home mom is associated with higher bouts of depression.

The finding holds true during children’s infancy and pre-school years, with researchers discovering working part-time conveys special benefits.

Researchers analyzed data, beginning in 1991 with interviews of 1,364 mothers shortly after their child’s birth and including subsequent interviews and observations spanning more than 10 years.

Apparently the key is doing some form of work, either on a part-time or full-time basis. Part-time employment was defined as between one and 32 hours per week.

“In all cases with significant differences in maternal well-being, such as conflict between work and family or parenting, the comparison favored part-time work over full-time or not working,” said lead author Cheryl Buehler, Ph.D.

“However, in many cases the well-being of moms working part-time was no different from moms working full time.”

For example, mothers employed part-time reported better overall health and fewer symptoms of depression than stay-at-home moms, while there were no reported differences in general health or depressive symptoms between moms employed part-time and those who worked full time, the study said.

Interestingly, the part-time and full-time working moms also showed no significant differences when it came to the women’s perception that their employment supported family life, including their ability to be a better parent, the authors wrote.

Investigators discovered mothers employed part-time were just as involved in their child’s school as stay-at-home moms, and more involved than moms who worked full time.

In addition, mothers working part-time appeared more sensitive with their pre-school children and they provided more learning opportunities for toddlers than stay-at-home moms and moms working full time.

Finding a part-time job may not be as difficult as it appears given the tough economic climate. Often employers look for cost savings and hire part-time employees because they typically do not receive the same level of benefits, such as health insurance, training and career advancement, the authors pointed out.

“Since part-time work seems to contribute to the strength and well-being of families, it would be beneficial to employers if they provide fringe benefits, at least proportionally, to part-time employees as well as offer them career ladders through training and promotion,” said study co-author Marion O’Brien, Ph.D.

Study participants were from 10 locations across the U.S., and included 24 percent ethnic minorities, 1 percent without a high school degree, and 14 percent single parents. The number of mothers employed part-time was fairly consistent at about 25 percent of the total over the span of the study, although mothers moved in and out of part-time work.

Study authors admit the investigation had limitations, including the fact that only one child in the family was included.

Additionally researchers chose to focus exclusively on work hours, and did not study other employment-related issues such as professional status, scheduling flexibility, work commitment and shift schedules.

The findings were published in the Journal of Family Psychology.

Source: American Psychological Association

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2011). Working May Help Mom’s Mental Health. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 19, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2011/12/13/working-may-help-moms-mental-health/32498.html

 

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