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Helping Others Stay Clean Can Reduce Teen Cravings

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on November 10, 2011

Helping Other’s Stay Clean Can Reduce Teen Cravings Case Western researchers have discovered a new method to reduce a teens craving for alcohol and drugs — have them help others.

The findings stem from the “Helping Others” study led by Maria Pagano, Ph.D.

Researchers studied 195 substance dependent juvenile offenders and found that helping others in 12-step programs significantly improves adolescent treatment response.

The research, which also discovered a benefit from a religious foundation, is featured in the November issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

“Our findings indicate that service participation in 12-step programs can reduce the craving symptoms experienced by adolescents in treatment for alcohol and or drug addiction,” Pagano said.

“Similarly, we found that substance-dependent adolescents with greater religious backgrounds participate more during treatment in 12-step programs of recovery, which leads to better health outcomes.”

The study is the first to examine the relationship between adolescent 12-step participation during treatment, lifetime religiosity, and clinical outcomes. Interestingly, the findings replicate results found among adults in Pagano’s prior collaborative research.

Investigators targeted 93 boys and 102 girls, ages 14-18, all court-referred for residential treatment at New Directions, the largest adolescent residential treatment facility in Northeast Ohio.

The majority were marijuana dependent (92%) with comorbid alcohol dependence (60%). Participants were interviewed within the first 10 days of treatment and two months later at treatment discharge.

Outcomes for the teens included urine toxicology screens, alcohol/drug craving symptoms, clinical characteristics, and global psychosocial functioning.

Pagano and colleagues found that Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous-related interventions, as part of treatment, improved four of seven outcomes.

Outcomes enhanced included reductions in two types of craving symptoms, reduced narcissistic entitlement, and improved psychosocial functioning.

Higher lifetime religious practices, such as prayer, worship, and meditation, were associated with higher service participation during treatment, which in turn, led to better outcomes.

“Because most religions encourage altruistic behaviors, youths entering treatment with greater religious backgrounds may have an easier time engaging in service in 12-step programs of recovery,” Pagano said. “In turn, youth entering treatment with low or no religious background may require greater 12-step facilitation or a different approach to derive equal benefit from treatment.”

The insights gained from the study are timely as adolescent addictions have increased dramatically over the last decade while resources have dwindled.

Craving for alcohol and drugs is a major precipitator of relapse and can linger long after the detoxification period. Pagano said this new “natural” approach of service participation is a low-cost method to reduce adolescents’ craving symptoms as they adjust to a sober lifestyle.

Source: Case Western Reserve University

Teenagers sitting together photo by shutterstock.

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2011). Helping Others Stay Clean Can Reduce Teen Cravings. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 21, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2011/11/10/helping-others-stay-clean-can-reduce-teen-cravings/31297.html

 

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