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Cultural Differences May Alter Therapy Approach

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on April 27, 2011

Cultural Difference May Alter Therapy ApproachProvocative new research suggests psychotherapeutic approaches should take ethnic values into consideration.

The discovery is pertinent for the Asian-American population – a group that over the past two decades has exhibited the fastest percentage growth of all major racial/ethnic groups in the United States.

Researchers found that some ethnic groups respond differently to positive emotions, and that one approach to remedying depression — that is, thinking happy thoughts, focusing on the good and downplaying the bad — may not be an appropriate strategy for Asians.

In the study, University of Washington psychologists surveyed college students and discovered Asian respondents showed no relationship between positive emotions and levels of stress and depression.

For European-American participants, however, the more stress and depression they felt, the fewer positive emotions they reported.

The study indicates that psychotherapies emphasizing positive emotions, which can relieve stress and depression in white populations, may not work for Asians, who make up 60 percent of the world population.

Techniques such as mindfulness therapies that encourage patients to pay attention to the good and the bad may be a better therapuetic approach.

The findings could have implications for helping Japanese citizens recover from the tsunami and subsequent nuclear crisis in March, and for Chinese coping with post-traumatic stress following the 2008 Sichuan province earthquake.

“If we are to relieve some of the trauma from the tsunami and earthquakes, we have to be careful of imparting Western therapies,” said Dr. Janxin Leu, UW assistant professor of psychology. “I worry that if a therapy which relies on positive emotions and thinking is used with Asian patients, it will not be effective and may even make patients feel worse.”

The study is published online in the journal Emotion.

The researchers asked 633 college students – a mix of Asian immigrants, Asian Americans and European Americans – to rate how much stress and depression they felt and how often they’ve been in a sad mood, felt worthless or had sleep or appetite changes.

The participants also rated the intensity of the positive emotions that they felt, including feelings of serenity, joy, confidence and attentiveness.

For European-American participants, there was a strong correlation showing that the more positive emotions they expressed, the less depression or stress they reported. The correlation was more subtle among Asian-Americans, but for Asians, there was no correlation between positive emotions and depression and stress.

The findings show that Asians interpret and react to positive emotions differently in regards to their mental health.

Upon winning an award, for instance, the researchers said that a typical response would be “I’m so happy that I’m afraid.” The award would trigger feelings of happiness for the achievement combined with concern that others would be jealous.

This blend of emotions is common among Asians, Leu said, and it may be shaped by Buddhist beliefs that happiness may lead to suffering or is illusory.

“Happiness signals that something bad will happen next; happiness is fleeting,” she said. Similarly, yin-and-yang attitudes may instill views that life is a natural balance of good and bad.

For Asians with depression, therapies likely to work the best are those that encourage patients to “observe when they feel good and bad and notice that both will disappear. Everything passes,” Leu said.

Source: University of Washington

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2011). Cultural Differences May Alter Therapy Approach. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 19, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2011/04/27/cultural-differences-may-alter-therapy-approach/25685.html