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Personalized Workspace Helps Attitude Adjustment

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on September 9, 2010

Personalized Workspace Helps Attitude AdjustmentA UK study finds workers’ job attitudes can be bolstered by allowing them to personalize their office.

The discovery challenges the conventional approach of standardization where managers often create a homogeneous corporate identity.

“Most contemporary offices are functional and offer very little user control, but our studies suggest this practice needs to be challenged,” says Dr. Craig Knight.

“When people feel uncomfortable in their surroundings they are less engaged — not only with the space but also with what they do in it. If they can have some control, that all changes and people report being happier at work, identifying more with their employer, and are more efficient when doing their jobs.”

The research involved more than 2,000 office workers in a series of studies looking at attitudes to — and productivity within — working space. This included two surveys of workers’ attitudes carried out via online questionnaires, as well as two experiments which examined workers’ efficiency when carrying out tasks under different conditions.

The surveys assessed the level of control workers had over their space — ranging from none at all to being fully consulted over design changes. Workers were then asked a series of questions about how they felt about their workspace and their jobs.

Results consistently showed that the more control people had over their office spaces, the happier and more motivated they were in their jobs. They felt physically more comfortable at work, identified more with their employers, and felt more positive about their jobs in general.

Two further studies, one at the university and another in commercial offices saw participants take on a series of tasks in a workspace that was either lean (bare and functional), enriched (decorated with plants and pictures), empowered (allowing the individual to design the area) or disempowered (where the individual’s design was redesigned by a ‘manager’).

People working in enriched spaces were 17 percent more productive than those in lean spaces, but those sitting at empowered desks were even more efficient — being 32 percent more productive than their lean counterparts without any increase in errors.

Professor Alex Haslam, who co-authored the research, said it was time for managers to recognize the potential improvements that can be made by handing some control of space over to workers and thereby giving them an opportunity to realize their own identity in the workplace.

He said: “Not only does office design determine whether people’s backs ache, it has the potential to affect how much they accomplish, how much initiative they take, and their overall professional satisfaction. Further research that we and others have carried out also highlights strong links between a lack of control over workspace and sickness in the office. All this could have a huge impact for firms of any size, yet employers rarely consider the psychological ramifications of the way they manage space. By paying more attention to employees’ needs they can boost wellbeing and productivity at minimal cost.”

Source: University of Exeter

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2010). Personalized Workspace Helps Attitude Adjustment. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 21, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/09/09/personalized-workspace-helps-attitude-adjustment/17905.html

 

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