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Art Therapy Reduces Asthma Anxiety

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on May 13, 2010

Art Therapy Reduces Asthma AnxietyA new study finds that art therapy can help reduce anxiety associated with pediatric asthma, improving quality of life.

In the first randomized clinical trial of art therapy for asthma, researchers found benefits after seven weekly art therapy sessions.

The findings are salient as asthma can be a terrifying experience. Attacks close down a child’s airways and make the simple act of breathing a life-threatening struggle.

The fear and anxiety associated with an asthma attack can last long after the attack has subsided.

The research, published online in the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology, reports that the art therapy showed benefits both during the therapy and for months afterward.

“Asthma impacts not only a child’s physical well-being but also has a considerable effect on a child’s quality of life and psychological development,” said Anya Beebe, MA, an art therapist at National Jewish Health.

“Our study shows that art therapy for children with severe, chronic asthma is clearly beneficial. Our results were striking and persisted for months after treatment stopped.”

In art therapy, patients create artwork that helps express their feelings about an illness, a trauma or medical concerns. The artwork can then serve as a starting point for discussions about these issues.

Researchers believe that creating art helps participants establish distance between themselves and their medical concerns. They learn to understand that they have a personal identity outside of their illness.

It is believed to be particularly effective with children because they often do not have the adult capabilities to verbally articulate their emotions, perceptions, or beliefs, and often can more comfortably convey ideas in ways other than talking.

In the study at National Jewish Health, 22 children, ages 7 to 14, with persistent asthma were randomized to either an active art-therapy group or a control group. The children in the art-therapy group received 60-minute art-therapy sessions once a week for 7 weeks.

Art-therapy sessions were designed to encourage discussion, expression and problem-solving in response to the emotional burden of chronic illness. Children in the control group completed evaluations but did not participate in art therapy.

Thse receiving art therapy show significant improvements in problem solving, communication, quality-of-life, anxiety and self-concept scores. At six months the active group maintained positive changes in anxiety and quality-of-life scores relative to those in the control group.

“Art therapy can be a valuable adjunct to the treatment of a child’s physical illness,” said senior author Bruce Bender, PhD, National Jewish Health Professor of Pediatrics.

Source: National Jewish Health

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2010). Art Therapy Reduces Asthma Anxiety. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 26, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/05/13/art-therapy-reduces-asthma-anxiety/13777.html