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Genetic Site for Schizophrenia

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on July 10, 2009

Genetic Site for SchizophreniaAn international group of researchers has found genetic evidence linking schizophrenia to a specific region of DNA – on chromosome 6.

This is the same area where key genes for immune function are located.

A LSU research team coordinated investigations at ten clinical sites. The work, led by Nancy Buccola, found common variants on chromosome 6p22.1 are associated with schizophrenia.

The findings are published in the journal Nature.

The researchers recruited study participants, people with diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, plus controls from the general population.

They analyzed data collected and also conducted a meta-analysis of data from the Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia, International Schizophrenia Consortium and SGENE data sets – thousands of DNA samples.

While a single gene does not appear to be the source of the development of schizophrenia, the researchers found variations on chromosome 6 that appear to be associated with higher risk. These variations were found most often in people with schizophrenia, leading the scientists to believe that these common variations contribute to the development of schizophrenia.

This area of chromosome 6, in the same area where genes important to the immune system function, provokes questions about whether or not treatments for autoimmune disorders might also be helpful in treating schizophrenia.

“Schizophrenia can be a devastating disease, and while treatments are improving, there are still people who do not respond or only partially respond,” notes Buccola, principal investigator on the LSUHSC study.

“Understanding the underpinnings of this illness will open doors to new and potentially better treatments.”

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling brain disorder that affects about 1.1 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year.

People with schizophrenia sometimes hear voices others don’t hear, believe that others are broadcasting their thoughts to the world, or become convinced that others are plotting to harm them.

These experiences can make them fearful and withdrawn and cause difficulties when they try to have relationships with others.

The research was supported by funding from the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression.

“Scientists have been looking for schizophrenia susceptibility genes since the early 1900s,” says Buccola. “This study shows that these genes can be found and sets the stage for future research.”

Source: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2009). Genetic Site for Schizophrenia. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 31, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2009/07/10/genetic-site-for-schizophrenia/7036.html