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Meds or CBT for Panic Disorder

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on May 28, 2007

Why a pharmaceutical approach helps some individuals with a mental health disorder, yet fails to help others, is a salient research question.

A group of Dutch investigators describe individual characteristics which may predict the efficacy of a pharmaceutical verse behavioral approach for treatment of panic disorder.

Historically, beliefs about the controllability of a disorder — termed locus of control (LOC) — is often relevant in the causation, maintenance and treatment of disorders.

In this study, researchers investigated whether a patient’s belief in the type of treatment for the panic disorder could predict outcome from the treatment.

The differential effectiveness of cognitive therapy and antidepressant treatment (paroxetine or clomipramine) was investigated in a sample of 129 panic disorder patients in a 12-week, pretest posttest placebo-controlled study.

Researchers discovered a locus of control orientation (LOC) predicted the effectiveness of cognitive therapy while LOC was not a precursor to pharmaceutical effectiveness for treatment of the disorder.

Source: Psychotherapy And Psychosomatics

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2007). Meds or CBT for Panic Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 28, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2007/05/28/meds-or-cbt-for-panic-disorder/856.html