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Depression amid Chronic Disease

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on January 29, 2007

Receiving the diagnosis of a chronic disease or cancer is a traumatic, life-changing event. Unfortunately, the mental health effect of the incident is often obscured by attention to the physical disorder and the inability to determine “appropriate sadness” from clinical depression.

Researchers have developed a new tool to detect depression that will improve patients’ ability to come to terms with their disease.

Depression affects 25 percent of patients with advanced cancer – the stage at which the disease has begun to spread from its original tumor. At this stage, depression is difficult to diagnose as symptoms can be confused with a patient displaying ‘appropriate sadness’ – feelings which commonly result from suffering a terminal illness.

Accordingly, a University of Liverpool research team has created a method of testing for depression so clinicians can introduce additional treatment to enable patients to cope with the cancer more effectively. The tool could also be applied to sufferers of other serious illnesses such as Parkinson’s Disease and chronic heart disease.

Based on a screening system originally developed for sufferers of post-natal depression, the new tool – known as the ‘Brief Edinburgh Depression Scale’ (BEDS) – includes a six-step scale that assesses a cancer patient’s mental condition. The test includes questions on worthlessness, guilt and suicidal thoughts.

Research lead, Professor Mari Lloyd-Williams commented: “The effects of depression can be as difficult to cope with as the physical symptoms of a terminal illness such as cancer. Patients often feel useless, that they are to blame, and even experience suicidal thoughts during cancer – these are all signs of depression but rarely elicited.

“It is vital that depression during cancer is identified so clinicians can implement appropriate treatment and intervention in the form of drugs or therapy, so the patient receives the optimum care possible.”

The BEDS has been used on 246 patients with advanced cancer. A quarter of those patients were shown to have depression that had previously not been diagnosed.

Professor Lloyd-Williams added: “Depression has a huge impact on in patients with advanced cancer – influencing the severity of pain and other symptoms, and greatly reducing quality of life. We hope our test will be introduced as a routine part of cancer care so patients’ quality of life can be improved in dealing with such a distressing disease.”

Source: University of Liverpool

 

APA Reference
Nauert, R. (2007). Depression amid Chronic Disease. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 26, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/news/2007/01/29/depression-amid-chronic-disease/579.html

 

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