Symptoms of Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder

By American Psychiatric Association

Recurrent depression is a form of Major Depression, where the depressive episodes recur on a regular basis, with intervals of no depression present in the individual. The specific diagnostic critera for recurrent depression are:

A. Presence of two or more Major Depressive Episodes.
Note: To be considered separate episodes, there must be an interval of at least 2 consecutive months in which criteria are not met for a Major Depressive Episode.

B. The Major Depressive Episodes are not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and are not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified.

C. There has never been a Manic Episode, a Mixed Episode, or a Hypomanic Episode.
Note: This exclusion does not apply if all of the manic-like, mixed-like, or hypomanic-like episodes are substance or treatment induced or are due to the direct physiological effects of a general medical condition.

 

APA Reference
Association, A. (2006). Symptoms of Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 24, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/lib/symptoms-of-recurrent-major-depressive-disorder/000630
Scientifically Reviewed
    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 30 Jan 2013
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.