No technique will make all stress go away. It is best when people use their own judgment and intuition to decide which techniques to use. People should not be afraid to try different things before deciding what is best for them. Once they have found some strategies that work, they need to commit to practicing them.

Exercise

Exercise is one of the best ways to manage stress. Aerobic exercise, exercise that makes the heart and lungs work harder, actually helps the body to use up excess stress-induced hormones. Regular exercise helps the body to react less dramatically to stress. Some research suggests that exercise also helps to lift one’s spirits and decrease depression.

Exercise is most helpful if it is practiced consistently over a long period of time. In beginning an exercise program, it is important to start slowly. It is not so helpful to start an exercise program with a lot of enthusiasm and then stop exercising in a week or two because it is too stressful.

Of course, it is recommended that people check with their regular physicians before beginning any exercise program; however, almost no one is too old or too out of shape to begin to exercise. Twenty or 30 minutes of exercise four or five times a week is ideal, but even much less can help individuals to relax and cope with stressful situations more effectively.

The specific type of exercise or the amount of time spent exercising is not as important as whether or not someone can make exercise a regular part of his or her life. Brisk walking is the perfect exercise for many people. Jogging, swimming and bicycling are other popular types of aerobic exercises. It makes sense to choose an exercise that is enjoyable; the more enjoyable it is, the more likely an exercise program will succeed.

Meditation

Meditation is a very effective stress management technique. Meditation sounds exotic, but it is really just a way to learn to relax and settle the mind. A relaxed, settled mind is less anxious and copes better with stress.

One type of widely-used meditation is called “mindfulness meditation.” It teaches the meditator to rest his or her mind steadily in the present moment even during stressful experiences. This creates a deep sense of relaxation and mental clarity. Anxious fears about the past or the future become less troubling.

Other popular types of meditation used for stress management include transcendental meditation and the relaxation response. A recent report to the National Institutes of Health concluded that, “More than 30 years of research, as well as the experiences of a large and growing number of individuals and healthcare providers, suggest that meditation and similar forms of relaxation can lead to better health, higher quality of life and lowered healthcare costs.” The report went on to say, “Most important, meditation techniques offer the potential of learning how to live in an increasingly complex and stressful society while helping to preserve health in the process.”

Other Stress Management Tools

Yoga is another popular stress-management tool. It combines aspects of both exercise and meditation; it can help people to slow down their minds and create relaxation in their body.

Psychotherapy also can be very effective in reducing stress. Aspects of one form of psychotherapy, called cognitive therapy, have been incorporated into many stress-management programs.

Other effective and widely-used stress-management techniques include progressive muscle relaxation, massage and biofeedback. It is also important to remember that when severe stress begins to cause depression, or affects someone’s ability to function at home or at work, medication prescribed by a doctor can be very helpful.

Deciding on a Stress Management Technique

No single strategy is right for everyone. Each person must take an honest look at him or herself and decide what makes the most sense. The most important factor in determining the success of a stress management program is not the type of technique that is used, but rather the commitment that each person makes to change.

It is difficult for people to change long-standing habits even when those habits create discomfort, unhappiness and stress. Change is possible, however, and the most difficult changes often provide the greatest benefit. Working to reduce stress can enhance happiness and health for many years. It does make a difference!

 

APA Reference
Bressert, S. (2006). Simple Steps for Managing Stress in Your Life. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 28, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/lib/simple-steps-for-managing-stress-in-your-life/000757
Scientifically Reviewed
    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 30 Jan 2013
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.