So you have been asked to take part in a research study! This can be a very satisfying experience, allowing you to help yourself now and to help others in the future. After all, without research, treatment cannot improve, and without those who take part, there would be no research! You are the one who makes research possible.

But how do you know if you want to take part? What questions should you ask? The researcher should answer these basic questions clearly for you. Others undoubtedly will arise during the discussion.

  • Why do you want me in your study?
  • What is the research about? How will this research help in treating or understanding my disorder?
  • What do I need to do and how much time will this take?
  • How might this study help me, my relatives, or other people with my disorder?
  • What possible risks are there to me or my relatives if I take part?
  • How will this be different from the care I am getting now, and do I have other options or choices?
  • Could my illness become worse during the study? What will happen if it does?
  • What will happen to me at the end of the study?
  • What should I do if I want to drop out of the study?
  • May I get back to you after I discuss this with my family/friend/case manager/doctor?

Remember to ask again if you do not understand the explanation to any question you have. And, if you forget the answers to these questions during the study, just ask them again.

 

APA Reference
Psych Central. (2006). Checklist of Questions for Clinical Trial Participants. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 27, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/lib/checklist-of-questions-for-clinical-trial-participants/000419
Scientifically Reviewed
    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 30 Jan 2013
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

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