Domestic Violence Library

  • Symptoms of Domestic Violence
    Abusive relationships have a powerful psychological impact on the victims. Victims of an abusive relationship may experience some of the following emotions and behaviors: Agitation, anxiety and chronic apprehension Constant state of alertness that makes it difficult ...
  • Steps to Address Domestic Violence
    Break the Silence Victims should talk to family, friends, neighbors or co-workers about the domestic violence they experience. It may be helpful to call a domestic violence hotline for information, referrals and support. Develop a Safety Plan When ...
  • Domestic Violence Organizations and Resources
    Hotlines There are local, state and national support systems available to help victims of domestic violence. They can help with housing, legal information, welfare, treatment and counseling. For a list of local and state domestic violence ...
  • Self Quiz: Am I in an Abusive Relationship?
    Below are some questions and checklists to help you determine if you are in an abusive relationship. Answer the questions honestly. If you answer "yes" to any of the following questions, you may be a ...
  • The Common Pattern of Domestic Violence
    In 1979, psychologist Lenore Walker found that many violent relationships follow a common pattern or cycle. The entire cycle may happen in one day or it may take weeks or months. It is different for ...
  • Men as Victims of Abuse in Heterosexual Relationships
    While it occurs far less often than men battering women, women sometimes batter their male partners. How often women abuse men is the subject of much debate. Studies report that women are victims of domestic violence ...
  • What Is Domestic Violence?
    Domestic violence is when one partner in an intimate relationship abuses the other. The abuse can be physical, sexual, emotional or a combination of all three. Physical abuse can include very aggressive acts, such as beatings ...
  • The Physical and Emotional Injuries of Domestic Violence
    All victims of domestic violence can be physically and emotionally injured. However, because of general strength differences between men and women, women are six to seven times more likely to receive serious physical injuries than ...
  • Understanding Domestic Violence
    Domestic violence, or violence in the family unit, with women and children as primary victims, is a major public health problem. Domestic violence constitutes a pattern of abusive behavior that includes the use or threat of ...
  • Telling Family and Friends about Your Abuse
    If you are like most people in abusive relationships, you have kept your abuse hidden from your close relatives and friends. When you do tell them, they may react in several different ways. First, your family ...
  • Understanding the Effects of Domestic Violence
    Domestic violence physically, psychologically and socially affects women, men and their families. Initially, the abuse usually is an attempt by one partner to exert control through intimidation, fear, verbal abuse or threats of violence. Victims of ...
  • What Causes Domestic Violence?
    Domestic violence may start when one partner feels the need to control and dominate the other. Abusers may feel this need to control their partner because of low self-esteem, extreme jealousy, difficulties in regulating anger ...
  • Taking Action with Domestic Violence
    When spouses, intimate partners or dates use physical violence, threats, emotional abuse, harassment or stalking to control the behavior of their partners, they are committing domestic violence. The first step is for the victim to understand ...
  • Who Are the Abusers of Domestic Violence?
    Abusers don't wear signs that say, "I'm an abuser." They can be doctors, lawyers, judges, nurses, policemen, clergymen, mechanics, janitors or the unemployed. They could be white, black, Asian, Hispanic or Native American. They may ...
  • Why Do Abused Victims Stay?
    It can be difficult for many people to understand why a person would stay in an abusive relationship, but there are many reasons. Strong emotional and psychological forces keep the victim tied to the abuser. ...

 

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