Overcoming 3 Common Obstacles in Therapy

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

Overcoming 3 Common Obstacles in TherapyIf you’re new to therapy, you may not know what to expect. To help you make the most of the process, we asked seasoned clinical psychologist Ryan Howes, Ph.D, to share the three biggest obstacles in therapy along with how to overcome each one.

 

Ghosting: I Never Heard From Him Again

by John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

Ghosting: I Never Heard From Him AgainMore than a decade ago, Carrie Bradshaw was on the receiving end of a modern break-up — on a post-it note.

Nowadays, people don’t even bother with writing something on a piece of paper. Now you’ll get a text, and that will be it. The end of your relationship — and perhaps the end of any further communication with your ex-partner.

If it was wrong a decade ago to break up with someone on something so impersonal as to disrespect the relationship, how much more wrong has it become to act as though the relationship never even existed?

Welcome to 2014 and “ghosting” — ending a relationship with zero explanation… and zero communication.

 

Psychology Around the Net: November 15, 2014

by Alicia Sparks

interview woman man job bigst

Job interviews, speech anxiety, and seasonal depression — oh, my!

This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers each of these topics and more.

Enjoy!

The Psychology of the Job Interview: Take these psychology tips, tricks, and techniques into consideration the next time you interview for a new position.

A Quick Cure for Speech Anxiety?: HINT: Not one of these tips involves imagining people in their underwear.

 

5 Mindful Eating Tips for a Zesty Life

by Laura C. Meyer

5 Mindful Eating Tips for a Zesty LifeCultivating a healthy relationship with food can increase our zest and taste for daily life.

1. Notice how you feel. Take a moment to close your eyes, breathe, and drop into what it feels like to be in your body. Does it feel dumpy, sluggish, drab, or low in energy?

Now, notice if there is a similar relationship to the foods you have been eating recently. For example, are you eating dumpy foods? Does your food look gray and dark? Overcooked, dull, lifeless? Simply notice if there is a relationship.

On a biological level, we are what we eat. Certain foods and their preparation carry potential vibrancy for increased flavor and life energy. See if adding more food with vibrant color and zest makes a difference.

 

How to Support & Help Someone with Depression

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

How to Support & Help Someone with Depression  Someone you know is struggling with depression. You want to help but you’re not sure how. You worry about saying the wrong thing, or doing the wrong thing. Or maybe you’ve already done or said the wrong thing.

There may be many reasons you’re having a hard time helping your loved one. But there also are many ways you can help.

Offer “love and kindness, first and foremost,” said writer Alexa Winchell. “Be kind to those of us suffering just as you would care for someone with the flu,” said Lisa Keith, PsyD, an assistant professor of special education at Fresno Pacific University.

What does this look like?

Below, you’ll find specific insights into the helpful — and unhelpful — ways you can be supportive from people who had or have depression.

 

Moods & Seasons

by Polly Campbell

Moods and SeasonsFootball. School supplies. Changing leaves. Cooling temperatures. These are a few of the things I love about fall. I also tend to feel calmer and more relaxed when autumn rolls around. Summer feels so brash, intense and bright. Fall somehow feels softer. Perhaps it’s because of the change in light.

New research led by Alison Jing Xu from the University of Toronto-Scarborough shows just how sensitive we are to bright light. In a brighter space, people in the experiment felt warmer, wanted spicier food, found others more aggressive, and even had a stronger reaction to words.

 

Best of Our Blogs: November 14, 2014

by Alicia Sparks
Best of Our Blogs

As the seasons change and the holidays approach, some spotlights are shone on certain mental health factors. We might feel more stressed (and this isn’t isolated to adults!) or dealing with mental illness might become more of a challenge.

Our bloggers tackle those topics and more in today’s Best of Our Blogs.

Red Leaf Tree

 

9 Quotes about Life from ‘Garden State’

by Lauren Suval

9 Quotes about Life from Garden State“Garden State” is a comedy-drama movie featuring Zach Braff and Natalie Portman that captures the state of transition young adults experience in a refreshing light. The narrative features psychological undertones.

Andrew Largeman (Braff) has been medicated since he was 10 years old, resulting in his emotional detachment. He is simply going through the motions of day-to-day life. Sam, a vivacious 20-something with problems of her own, inspires Andrew to start really living.

Following are some thought-provoking quotes from the film (along with my own interpretations).

 

7 Signs Your Workplace is Toxic

by Melody Wilding, LMSW

toxic office

For many people, the office can feel like a second home. You spend the majority of your waking hours there and your co-workers may likely be the people you interact with most in your life, after family or a spouse.

If you’re not happy with your work environment, that dissatisfaction can carry over into your personal life, damaging everything from your self-esteem to your friendships. Toxic workplaces also can have an impact on your health: the increased stress of working in a dysfunctional office can lead to job burnout, fatigue, listlessness, and depression.

If any of the above symptoms ring a bell with you, it’s time to take stock of the dysfunction in your workplace in order to evaluate if the situation is fixable — or decide if it’s time to move on with your career.

 

Developing Self-Awareness as a Parent

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

Developing Self-Awareness as a ParentFor parents, being self-aware is key for connecting to their kids. When parents aren’t self-aware, they might get caught up in their own emotions instead of being present with their children. They also might not recognize that they’re unconsciously repeating the patterns of their own childhoods in their parenting today.

As Carla Naumburg, Ph.D, writes in her book Parenting in the Present Moment: How to Stay Focused on What Really Matters, “The coping skills and autonomic responses we develop over the years are like the air we breathe. More often than not, we don’t notice that air until it’s choking us.”

 

How to Remain Calm in a Trying Situation

by Michael Hedrick

How to Remain Calm in a Trying SituationI’ve had my fair share of overwhelming times. There have been times where I’ve been so thrown back in my chair that I had to excuse myself from the situation to get a grip on things. If it wasn’t anxiety it was a punch to the gut as some sort of veiled insult or rejection. These things can happen often and it takes skill not to let them get the best of you.

Just yesterday I was hanging out with a girl I liked and she mentioned that she had a new boyfriend. That may seem trivial, and it probably is, but I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t taken aback. I’ve learned (with a lot of practice, though) to just roll with the punches. I don’t let trivialities get to me much anymore and I think it’s a skill that could benefit everyone.

 

10 Questions to Avoid Passive-Aggressive Co-Parenting

by Dr. Karen Finn

Teenage girl in trouble with parents

Your child is hears (and feels) all of those subtle pot-shots you take at your ex.

Everyone knows the basics of co-parenting: stay kid-focused, don’t use your kids as messengers, never use your kids as scapegoats, show up on time, and don’t talk negatively about your ex in front of your kids. It all seems pretty straight-forward and doable — at least it does on the surface.

But real-life isn’t lived on the surface and sometimes, in all of that “trying” to be nice, you’re actually just being passive-aggressive and probably doing more harm than good. Most of the time it’s pretty obvious whether or not you’re taking care of the basics. You know if you’re staying kid-focused, or using your kids as messengers or scapegoats, or showing up on time, but what might not be as obvious is whether you’re putting out more toxic energy and negativity about your ex in front of your children than you realize.

 

 
Recent Comments
  • ek_ladki: “Genshai”? There is no such word in the Hindi language.
  • amandaundialed.: I completely agree with you. I’m thankful that I have read this, and that other people...
  • amandaundialed.: Amazing advice. You should be the administrator of most sites. Thank you very much; I found your...
  • amandaundialed.: :) thank you
  • amandaundialed.: But … What I think I read was that you can ask a psychologist for a rate ;whilst not free, is...
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 10751
Join Us Now!