5 Mindful Treatments for Rumination

by Laura C. Meyer

5 Mindful Treatments for RuminationRumination is a mental habit which leads to fixation on flaws and problems, thus extending a negative mood.

With continued attention to our problems, we become obsessed with our pain and can retreat from life. We stop eating (or eating more), sex drive disappears, sleep is disrupted, we are tired all the time, life is dull, and we do less and less.

Rumination starts off as a dim light that we stop putting energy into, allowing it to get darker and darker until we can’t see anymore.

 

Why the Issues that We Ignore Often Come Back to Plague Us

by Gretchen Rubin

austerpaulIn his memoir Hand to Mouth: A Chronicle of Early Failure novelist Paul Auster wrote:

“By the end of 1977, I was feeling trapped, desperate to find a solution. I had spent my whole life avoiding the subject of money, and now, suddenly, I could think of nothing else.”

This reminded me of a thought-provoking interview I did with personal finance expert Zac Bissonnette a few years ago.

 

Adapting to Change

by Kristi A. DeName

Adapting to ChangeThe leaves soon will turn into the familiar shades we love to remind us that the seasons change and nature transitions. People also experience transitions requiring adjustment. We experience loss, whether it be in the form of a person, pet, place, job, habit, or object. We experience loss in the form of change. We experience loss within ourselves.

Loss is scary. It is unsettling and can feel overwhelming. With it, feelings of sadness, nostalgia, anxiety, and confusion may arise. It is difficult to fully accept loss. After the immediate loss, the brain rejects change and resists adapting to the new version of what your life will be. Resisting change only intensifies our reactions of fear and panic.

 

30 Journaling Prompts for Self-Reflection and Self-Discovery

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

30 Journaling Prompts for Self-Reflection And Self-Discovery I often include different journal prompts on Weightless because I think it’s key to continually maintain a dialogue with ourselves. It’s part of building a healthy relationship, or rather a friendship, with yourself.

As Eleanor Roosevelt said, “Friendship with oneself is all important, because without it one cannot be friends with anyone else in the world.”

 

Psychology Around the Net: September 27, 2014

by Alicia Sparks

Computer Troll

Need caught up on this week’s psychology-related news around the ‘net? From Alanis Morissette’s view on happiness to what NOT to say to someone with bipolar disorder, we’ve got you covered.

Behind the Online Comments: The Psychology of Online Trolls: We’ve all experienced them. Now find out what motivates them.

Most US Kids Who Take ADHD Meds Don’t Get Therapy: Fewer than a quarter of US children prescribed ADHD also receive talk therapy, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Pediatrics recently reported of the findings from study conducted by the nonprofit research organization RAND.

Tax Court: Anxiety, Depression Are Not Physical Injuries: Ever wonder how the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) views anxiety?

 

Rejecting or Embracing the Sacred in Meditation

by George Hofmann

Rejecting or Embracing the Sacred in MeditationI recently taught a class in creative contemplation that was based on Lectio Divina, or divine reading. It is a practice undertaken by contemplative Christians and monks in which one completely surrenders to the voice of God as inspired by a line of scripture.

I have no real allegiance to Christianity, other than my upbringing, and presented the practice in a completely secular course. Much modern meditative and contemplative forms are presented this way. Centuries-old sacred traditions are stripped of theology and much underlying philosophy as a means of adapting each to a stressful, material world. It is sort of like insisting that prayer without an object or spirit to pray to will bring about a miracle. The act, not the deity, holds the influence.

 

You Don’t Have to Do Everything Perfectly

by Michael Hedrick

self-image-meme

One of my biggest struggles is the fact that I feel like I have to do everything just right. There’s some small part of me that kind of panics if I don’t do things correctly, or the way I imagine they should be done.

 

Therapists 2014: The Intersection between Clinician, Business Savvy & Personal Brand

by Lisa Brookes Kift, MFT

Therapists 2014: The Intersection between Clinician, Business Savvy & Personal BrandIn October 2009, I wrote my first piece in a series for Psych Central on the changing landscape of therapists online. Psychotherapists Unmasked on the Internet reflected upon a conversation I’d had with my psychiatrist father five years prior, who gave me an earful around the ethics of having my picture up on my website.

What he didn’t realize at that time was that websites were becoming an important marketing tool in our profession and that a move toward therapist demystification was occurring. A hearty discussion among many in our field around how to navigate it all was under way.

 

Best of Our Blogs: September 26, 2014

by Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A.
Best of Our Blogs

When we are confused, we want answers.

When we are lost, we so want to be found.

When we are lonely, we want to fill our moments with the chatter of anything, the television, the internet, with others.

When we feel empty, we want to fill the holes in our selves with food, alcohol, drugs, drama, etc.

When we are ill, we spend all our energies on wishing we felt better.

It’s difficult to sit in discomfort. It’s hard to accept the reality of what is. But while things generally resolves itself if we let it, it takes time.

“Care of the soul is not a project of self-improvement nor a way of being released from the troubles and pains of human existence. It is not at all concerned with living properly or with emotional health. There are the concerns of temporal, heroic, Promethean life…We care for the soul solely by honoring its expressions, by giving it time and opportunity to reveal itself, and by living life in a way that fosters the depth, interiority, and quality in which it flourishes.” – Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul

As Moore eloquently writes, by not judging our paths or focusing on the means to an end, we give ourselves the time, space and ability to let things unfold. And that’s where healing, growth and nourishing the soul takes place. It’s not in trying to cure or solve or fix, but in acceptance, forgiveness and realizing that whatever you’re feeling is right for the moment you’re in. It’s about letting things be.

Reading our posts this week may not fix what’s ailing you. It may not relieve you of your suffering. It may only temporarily minimize your discomfort. But through reading the experiences of our bloggers in the midst of their own struggles, perhaps you’ll remember that there is hope, support and purpose in the most difficult of moments.

{Photo from here.}

{Photo from here.}

 

8 Practical Suggestions for Parents of Kids with ADHD

by Angelica Shiels, PsyD

help-kids-navigate-computers-online-digital-useThe school year is back upon us, and parents of kids with ADHD probably could use some support and tips. So here are some suggestions:

1. Manage your expectations.

Children with ADHD have a legitimate neurological condition that impairs planning, organization, impulse control, focus, and attention. ADHD cannot be cured, but it can be managed with teaching strategies, accommodations, practicing difficult skills, and, sometimes, medication.

 

How to Know if You’re Truly Resilient

by Jan Bruce

How to Know if You're Truly ResilientIf there’s a word people in the top ranks of human capital are buzzing about these days, it’s resilience. I get asked all the time what it means — followed by questions about how to get more of it.

I’ve done lots (and lots) of reading and thinking and speaking about resilience. I’ve watched it in action, experienced it myself, and heard more than one person oversimplify it (“The ability to bounce back,” for instance), while hearing others attempt to explain it biologically and psychologically (and go on far too long).

The fact is, resilience in a person is far more than a tough-as-Teflon surface or rubbery resolve that helps you rebound from stress or disappointment.

 

Yet Again: A Blood Test for Depression? I’m Not Holding My Breath

by John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

Yet Again: A Blood Test for Depression? I'm Not Holding My BreathThe news articles are breathless. “Objective Blood Test Can Diagnose Depression,” “Blood Test Flags Depression, Predicts Treatment Response,” and “There’s A Blood Test That Can Diagnose Depression!”

Wow! That’s just darned amazing. You mean we can draw blood from a patient (in a lab, which is usually some place separate you have to go to than the doctor’s office for many in America), send it off for processing, and two weeks later, get a result to see if the person has depression?

Or, you can take an objective, scientific screening quiz — like this one — in about a minute or two and have an instant result. Which is more amazing again??

Deja vu is setting in… like we’ve covered this topic before. And, in fact, we have. Not just once, but more that a few times.

 

 
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