Comments on
6 More Ways to Manage Clinical Depression

By Therese J. Borchard
Associate Editor

6 More Ways to Manage Clinical DepressionIn a prior blog post, I listed seven ways to manage severe, clinical depression when you can’t get out of bed.

The suggestions are different than the popular tips most depression experts give for boosting your mood, which are usually written for those with mild or moderate depression — or the really lucky people who just want to feel better.

I thought it would be helpful to expand my list and give you six more ways to manage severe depression.

7 Comments to
6 More Ways to Manage Clinical Depression

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  1. Thanks Therese! That is a great list – things that really make sense for folks suffering from severe depression.

  2. Good post. I am still messing up on accepting invitations, and reaching out – and this is particularly dangerous because after a while, people may give up. They think you don’t care about THEM. It took a long while to get that through my head. Depressions is not just a burden, it tend to make you self centered!

    Crying – my maybe not so odd experience with antidepressants. As happy as I am to have had the help of medicines to avoid real downs, I have found that they screw up my emotional reactions – including the ability to cry. I do remember that feeling of relief after a good cry. Sounds dumb, huh? I find that the meds dull some responses (to intense music as well). A trade.
    I love your Henri Nouwen quote. Another thanks to you.

  3. Thank you for your post! I so needed this reminder and am saving your post for future reference, when I am in need of another reminder of hope :)

  4. As someone who has struggled with severe depression for five years and counting, best of luck to those who know and understand the struggle. Don’t ever give up!

  5. Thank you so much for your seven and six ways of managing clinical depression. For someone who has been struggling with it for seven years, I think you have some pretty good points. The problem I have with the excepting of every invitation, however, is that I have very few friends and have social phobia. So on the rare occasions that I get asked to hangout, I tend to panic and decline in some excuse I just made up. Delaying all decisions is another nice one. Whenever I start having thoughts of death, I always allow myself to cry and then after always think, “I’ll see how I feel tomorrow.” I wish I delayed on my decision to go to college though. I thought I would feel better since it “would be different than high school” but all it made me feel was worse. Though it’s exhausting, I just take it one day at a time.

  6. I go through serious depression and I realize that I should socialize more. But the idea of never having solitude is horrifying to me. I’m an introvert and I NEED time to think, write, read, meditate, etc.

    Even in the hospital, I was allowed to go to my room when I needed to and if my more extroverted room mate wasn’t there I had some semi privacy(open door, occasionally being looked in on.).

  7. You need to take Robin Williams off the list as it currently undermines your idea.

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