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Best of Our Blogs: July 31, 2012

By Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A.
Associate Editor

It’s difficult to avoid wading in the pool of self-pity. This is especially true if you have legitimate reasons why you deserve to. Maybe you’re grieving the loss of a loved one, a job, a relationship or you pre-diagnosis.

Once you’re in the water, it feels nice even if nice means being sad, disappointed, or bitter. The desire to step outside of self-pity, while necessary for happiness, feels cold and scary. After a while people can grow more accustomed to feeling down than they do feeling hopeful or happy in their lives. They might seek out sad songs, movies or books. Or gravitate toward people with sad stories to commiserate with. But while it feels good to be in the same boat with others, doing so will never get you out of the rut you’re in. It will just lead to more of the same thing you’ve already been feeling-despair and a sense of hopelessness.

As someone who has been on that dreary path, I can vouch for the beauty of being more positive. And contrary to what others may think, it’s not about being fake, Pollyanna-ish or delusional about the truth. It’s simply about living a life filled with happiness, health and hope. And who wouldn’t want to live a life like that?

If you’re ready to stop playing that sad music, scroll down to read our posts. You’ll discover how music can play a prominent role in your psyche, how hope can help heal you, and as an added bonus this week, you might even feel inspired to make positive changes in your life.

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