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Wrong Place, Right Time

By Misty E. Vogel MA, NCC

Wrong Place, Right TimeThis past Easter Sunday I was heading back from the grocery store, enjoying a song on the radio and looking forward to the day. Suddenly, out of nowhere, a dog and a cat bolted into the street in front of me, the dog chasing the cat. I ended up hitting and killing the cat.

At first I wasn’t sure if I had hit both animals… I stopped the car in the middle of the street, got out and realized the cat was not going to survive.

It was devastating. I am fortunate because the dog’s owner came running out after the dog and acknowledged this was all his fault, although it sounds like it was all just an accident and no negligence on his or my behalf.

2 Comments to
Wrong Place, Right Time

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  1. One way to recover from this very sad experience might be to make something good come from the very sad accident. Adopt a cat from a shelter or make a donation to a cat charity or shelter. Good article.

  2. I think this is an important story, and resonates with an insight I had last week.
    Two months ago I decided to search for information that would reassure me that the wifi smart meters
    recently placed on the exterior wall of my bedroom were in fact safe. A year before I had heard a radio program here in CA about the issue and my impression was that the devices were not safe.
    y search for reassurance of safety ended in failure
    but led to another search. How could some individuals holding high official state government positions and some individuals assoc with high academic accomplishment foist dangerous devices onto an unsuspecting public’s homes and schools
    and lie about the safety?
    This perplexed me because no one I know would do that. Last week while I happened to think of Crazy Kitty years ago who was pooping in a walkway and
    I did not want her to. I stuck her nose in the doodoo to discourage her . I do not know where I got that notion.
    Not much later I discovered that she was very ill.
    I felt terrible and when I think if it now I still feel a terrible pang of regret because she was a lovely proud cat.
    SO then I wondered how people holding official positions of trust, that exist to protect the public safety, do something that is almost certain to slowly, over time on a molecular level cause serious damage to
    the DNA and Blood-Brain Barriers of some unknown portion of the captive customers of the private legal utility monopoly companies operating in CA and not be racked with guilt and regret?
    From myself I realized that ethics have a physiological origin; it is not by training etc. that I regret harm I do others, and if I had early learned my true nature has this inescapable conscience-empathy
    capacity built in, I think I would not have done the several unkind and inconsiderate things to
    other people that when I recall them produce in me an emotionally based regret.

    Have psychopaths [people without the built-in capacity for conscience-empathy-remorse] infiltrated the gatekeeper government positions that should have stopped the deployment of virtual slow kill devices to my home and so many others, I wonder? Is it because they do not know us 15 million targets?
    If they ran over the cat, would they feel nothing, I wonder?
    The cat story is important because it highlights the physical, natural component of most of humanity
    that seemingly ought to work on a local and a world wide scale to make a peaceful cooperative planet as a natural projection of the ball and chain of remorse if one defies one’s true nature.

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