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Black Pain: An African American Woman Exposes Stigma in the Black Community

I first learned about the (even greater than among white folks) stigma of mental illness in the Black community when I participated in a six-week outpatient program at Laurel Hospital. Half the group was African American, and I got to hear their stories, which horrified me. Most of them could not reveal to any member in their family what they were doing (the outpatient program) because the stigma is so deep and tall and wide.

My heart went out to them. Without support from the community, or at least family and friends, how does a person recover?

So I was delighted to hear bestselling author and licensed social worker Terri M. Williams speak at the Mental Health America this summer. She inscribed for me a copy of her evocative and insightful book Black Pain: It Just Looks Like We’re Not Hurting, with these words: “Be bold and courageous on the journey. Stay strong and God bless.”

I wish you all those same exact words.

On Terrie’s amazon page, I found a powerful video about her ministry.

Here’s a peak inside Terri’s book

One Comment to
Black Pain: An African American Woman Exposes Stigma in the Black Community

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  1. Hi Terri,thankyou for giving us a voice!I have a son with severe schizoaffective disorder.I couldnt believe how many times I and my son were dismissed by psychiatrists.
    They just didnt know…they didnt know the power that a mother has when fighting for her childs health.
    Lets just say squeeky hinges get the oil…lol…
    ~Super Mom:)


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