Anger

Love Gone Awry

"It began as the love of my life; it ended up with a restraining order."

Celeste was trying hard to keep it all together. "He was so loving and attentive. I thought I had hit the jackpot. How could a girl ask for anything more?"

When you’re young, naïve and have a low opinion of yourself, nothing says I love you like "I want to be with you every moment of the day. We were meant for each other. We will always be together as one." Are these Hallmark sentiments, or control masquerading as love?
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Brain and Behavior

Differences Between a Psychopath vs Sociopath


Society has conspired with Hollywood to put two seemingly-sexy psychology terms into our collective consciousness -- psychopath and sociopath. Psychopath and sociopath are pop psychology terms for what psychiatry calls an antisocial personality disorder. Today, these two terms are not really well-defined in the psychology research literature.

Nonetheless, there are some general differences between these two types of personality types, which we'll talk about in this article.

Both types of personality have a pervasive pattern of disregard for the safety and rights of others. Deceit and manipulation are central features to both types of personality. And contrary to popular belief, a psychopath or sociopath is not necessarily violent.

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Best of the Web

Top 10 PTSD Blogs of 2014

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often is linked to military veterans, but it can affect anyone following a traumatic event. There are five subtypes: normal stress response, acute stress disorder, uncomplicated PTSD, comorbid PTSD and complex PTSD. Sleep disturbances and flashbacks, where the sufferer relives the trauma, are hallmarks of the disease.

PTSD has several other symptoms, some of which overlap with other disorders. These include a loss of interest in regular activities, feeling depressed, anxious and difficulty concentrating. A person with PTSD may find it difficult to relate to loved ones. Instead they are emotionally distant and consumed with a sense of dread.

These blogs have been selected because they contain links and strategies specifically for people with PTSD in its various forms.

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Anger

A Brief History of Humor’s Power and Danger

An understanding of the power and concomitant danger of humor has never been as necessary as it is today. Humor was the impetus for the brutal slaying of 12 employees of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, and for threats of violence from North Korea over the release of the U.S. comedy movie "The Interview," but these recent events are far from unique in humor’s complex history.

The fear of the weapon of humor was alive and well in Nazi Germany. The legal code of the time reflected Goebbels’s interpretation of the political joke as “a remnant of liberalism” that threatened the Nazi state. Not only was joke-telling made illegal, but those who told jokes were labeled “asocial” -- a segment of society frequently sent to concentration camps.
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Ethics & Morality

Recognizing Expressions of Spiritual Activism


In these last few weeks we’ve witnessed countless bold, inspiring acts of Spiritual Activism, with people holding space for equality, inclusion, justice and love. In case you’ve missed any of them, and need a dose of what’s right in the world, read on.

1. Healing Racism: In the face of great sadness, pain and confusion in the wake of the Mike Brown case in Ferguson and Eric Garner decision in New York, there has been an awe inspiring and very visible response in hundreds of cities and towns, where folks have gathered in great numbers, marched, rallied, prayed and staged "die-ins" calling out for the much needed transformation and healing to end racism.

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Bullying

I’d Never Tell Anyone This, But…

I was 12 years old when my 16-year-old cousin got me alone in a room and started feeling me up. I remember being so shaken and scared. I didn’t know what to do.

When I came home, I told my mother. I shall never forget what she said to me: “Stop making up stories. Your cousin is a good boy. You know that. Why would you want to say bad things about him? What’s wrong with you?”

I froze. Could I have imagined the whole thing? Could it not have happened? Could it have been my fault? I ran up to my room and never mentioned the incident again.

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General

CIA Torture Report: A Sad Day for Psychologists

This week marks a low point for U.S. psychologists. Two psychologists were responsible for devising the CIA program that uses "enhanced interrogation techniques" -- what the rest of the world calls torture -- on certain detainees after 9/11.

It also took the American Psychological Association years to clarify its ethical policies on how psychologists could be involved in the torture of suspects. (In contrast, the American Psychiatric Association -- representing U.S. psychiatrists -- simply invoked an outright ban for its members from being a part of any torture interrogation.)

One of the two psychologists -- who were paid handsomely ($81 million) for their program development -- even had the audacity to defend his work to the Associated Press yesterday.

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General

‘I Can’t Breathe:’ People with Mental Illness & the Police Response


The outrage for no one being held accountable for Eric Garner's death at the hands of the police -- for selling cigarettes on the street, a petty crime at best -- is pouring over.

And it's no wonder. The officers' heavy-handed tactics in handling this nuisance crime were over-the-top. Garner repeatedly told the officers, "I can't breathe," even as they were suffocating him -- apparently oblivious to his very real distress.

If anybody other than a police officer was responsible for Garner's death, someone would have at least been indicted on a manslaughter charge. But because it was a police officer, no justice will apparently be had.

Sadly, Garner is just the latest in a long history of police "over-zealousness" when it comes to dealing with people who just won't abide by their instructions. People with a mental illness have long been given short shrift when it comes to being treated with simple decency and restraint by police officers all across the country.

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General

Can New York City Fix Its Mental Health Treatment Problem?

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio believes he can fix New York City's terrible problem within its criminal justice system and its poor treatment (and mistreatment) of people with mental illness. He's putting some much-needed money where his mouth is -- $130 million, to be specific.

The money will be used to help begin to reform how those with mental illness are treated while in custody, help shunt them over to treatment services as a first response, and train all of its police officers on how to respond to people with mental illness with compassion rather than violence.

But is it enough to address the problems of providing timely public mental health care to those in the criminal justice system, in a city of 8+ million?

Probably not.

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Autism

How to Degrade a Human Being at JRC

In Massachusetts -- supposedly one of the most enlightened and liberal states you can live in in our fine United States -- a facility is engaged in a horrifying business. Some have even call it state-sanctioned torture on American soil.

They degrade human beings daily, calling it a form of "treatment."

They do this regardless of the lack of scientific evidence on the treatment (outside a few flimsy studies published by the facility's former disgraced director, Matthew Israel). They do it even when important safeguards were lacking for years.

Yes, I'm talking about the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center (JRC) in Canton, Massachusetts. And yet another survivor from that institute is speaking out.

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Anger

Pumpkin Fest Madness & the Age of Narcissism

"It's just like a rush. You're revolting from the cops ... It's a blast to do things that you're not supposed to do."
-- Steven French, age 18 [1]

When I first saw the headline -- “Pumpkin Festival Riot” -- I thought it might be a parody, along the lines of spoofs published by The Onion.

But it was all too true: there really was a riot at the “Pumpkin Festival” held Oct. 19th, 2014 in Keene, New Hampshire. What is it about a small-town annual festival that has turned it into a chance to party -- and riot? Does it say something about changing societal norms?

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Love Crimes: When the Abused Believe It’s for Their Own Good

One of the most nurturing, compassionate women I know is also an abused wife who once shared her biggest regret. Did she regret staying with her abusive husband? No. The most regretful day of her life was when she phoned the police after he physically assaulted her yet again.

“I ruined his life,” she said. “It’s the biggest mistake I ever made.” Immune to any reason, she pressed on, blaming herself for the “humiliation he had to endure” at anger management classes, the draining of her family’s resources on lawyer fees and the indelible black mark “she caused” on his otherwise spotless veneer.

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