Treatment Articles

Defeating Depression with a Pill

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Defeating Depression with a PillThere was literally a time when patients suffering from depression used to talk about their problems. But times have changed and now talk therapy is becoming a rarer form of treatment in favor of psychotropic drugs.

A pair of studies, which ran from 1998 to 2007, tracked the use of antidepressants versus psychotherapy to treat depression among inpatients. Both were a followup of sorts to similar research done a decade earlier which saw a doubling in the amount of outpatients treated with antidepressants for this population. From 1987 to 1997, the percentage of patients prescribed antidepressant medication rose from 37.3 percent to 74.5 percent.

Do HIPAA Regulations Act as Barriers to Care?

Monday, June 23rd, 2014

Do HIPAA Regulations Act as Barriers to Care?Privacy rights and protections of health information take on a special meaning when participating in mental health care. Many factors contribute. Stigma, family dynamics and employability are just a few reasons why it is important to protect a patient’s medical records from prying eyes. However, some would argue that HIPAA regulations can actually prevent people from receiving vital and immediate care.

Are Antidepressants Enough?

Sunday, June 22nd, 2014

Are Antidepressants Enough?Zinc, exercise, Vitamin D and potential stress busters top the list of new possibilities to supplement the widespread use of antidepressant medicines. The latest research is welcome because antidepressants only work about half the time, and they often come with unwanted side effects, such as low libido, weight gain, and in some cases (believe it or not) depression.

When Depression Lies & You Feel Like a Failure

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

When Depression Lies & You Feel Like a Failure

Anybody who’s grappled with depression knows this: depression lies (or hashtag #depressionlies if you prefer). It tells us the sweet, seductive story that our life is bleak, without hope and therefore, without meaning.

But perhaps nobody knows this more than people who head up a company and are responsible for the livelihoods (and in some cases, the very lives) of their staff and employees. They feel the burden of responsibility even more if they have investors, advisers and bankers.

We know it because of highly-publicized suicides like Aaron Swartz and Jody Sherman — people who had bright futures, but couldn’t see them through the cloudy haze of the lies depression tells.

3 Myths about Managing Bipolar Disorder

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

3 Myths about Managing Bipolar DisorderA common myth about bipolar disorder is that you need to experience a depressive episode in order to be diagnosed with the illness, according to Kelli Hyland, M.D., a psychiatrist in outpatient private practice in Salt Lake City, Utah.

However, a person only needs to experience a hypomanic or manic episode, she said.

Many other myths abound – misconceptions that can jeopardize how you manage and live with the disorder. Below are three such myths.

5 Mistakes People Make When Managing Their Depression

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

5 Mistakes People Make When Managing Their DepressionWhen you’re treating any illness, making mistakes is inevitable. After all, making mistakes is how you learn, grow and get better.

Depression is a difficult illness, which colors how you see and feel about yourself. So, if you find yourself making the “mistakes” below, try not to judge yourself. Rather, view these mistakes as stepping stones, as signposts that lead you in a more helpful direction.

5 Myths About Managing Anxiety

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

5 Myths about Managing AnxietyMany people hold various myths that can stall and sabotage their anxiety treatment. In fact, these beliefs can fuel and perpetuate anxiety. Below two anxiety experts share five myths about managing anxiety and anxiety in general.

Can a Classroom Lecture Treat Depression?

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Can a Classroom Lecture Treat Depression?For all of the treatments available for clinical depression, no single one reliably works for everyone. One person may improve on Wellbutrin, while another finds relief from a therapist. It’s a maddening, time-consuming trial-and-error effort.

Worse yet, most people don’t even bother seeking out treatment for their depression. They stumble through life in depression’s gray haze, trying to make the best of things by using whatever coping skills they’ve got. Friends. Alcohol. Work. Video games. Exercise.

But what if simply listening to someone teach you about depression — like in a classroom — could actually help treat it?

The Awkward Place between Conventional & Alternative Medicine

Monday, May 26th, 2014

natural-homeopathy-therapyI’m hanging out on some rough terrain between conventional and alternative medicine, not sure if dabbling in both simultaneously is allowed. I can feel the tension between them as real as I did between my parents during their hostile divorce when I was 11.

Getting to the Good Part in Therapy

Sunday, May 25th, 2014

Getting to the Good PartWhen I was young, my mom would drive me to the airport for my return flight to California after a visit. The trip to the airport was about 20 minutes.

Inevitably we would get into an intensely personal conversation where I would share whatever fears and insecurities I felt. At that time in my life, I was troubled and confused.

Cutting National Healthcare Costs Through Broader Mental Wellness Access

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

Cutting National Healthcare Costs Through Broader Mental Wellness AccessIn 2010, over 6.4 million emergency room visits involved treatment for mental health conditions or substance abuse. That number is up 28 percent from just four years earlier. Though many of these cases may be due to serious illnesses or related injuries, too many are preventable with ongoing mental wellness management.

These visits cost America’s already overburdened emergency rooms millions each year. In 2003, mental health visits cost hospitals $20.3 billion. By some estimates, that number will nearly double to a whopping $38.5 billion in 2014.

Bringing Mental Health to the Forefront of Education

Monday, May 5th, 2014

Bringing Mental Health to the Forefront of Education

America has been recognizing May as Mental Health Month since 1949. During the month of May, mental health organizations work together with other community members to raise awareness about mental health issues. But the question remains: What else can be done to raise much-needed mental health awareness?

While a month dedicated to mental health is a nice start, it’s a start that occurred in 1949. In any given day, our children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, sisters and brothers may be suffering from mental health challenges of which they are unaware. As a result, the nation is in a crisis due to the numerous tragedies occurring in school settings.

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